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Courses

ACC 100 - Basic Accounting

This course emphasizes the procedural aspects of financial accounting for a sole proprietorship. The entire accounting cycle is analyzed for service and merchandising businesses. Specialized accounting procedures for cash, payroll accounting, the voucher system, and special journals are applied through manual and automated accounting systems. This non-transfer course is intended for those students planning to take only one semester of accounting or for those who need preparation before enrolling in ACC 101.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

ACC 101 - Financial Accounting

This course presents accounting as an information system that produces summary financial statements, primarily for users external to a business enterprise organized as a corporation. Students study the forms of business organization and the common transactions entered into by businesses. The emphasis is on understanding and applying basic accounting principles and other concepts that guide the reporting of the effect of transactions and other economic events on the financial condition and operating results of a corporation. The procedures of how to analyze and interpret historical financial statements, as well, and the limitations of using these in making forward-looking business decisions is included. The primary content emphasis will be accounting for current assets and liabilities, long-term assets and liabilities, corporations, cash flow statements, and financial statement analyses.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: BUS 903

4 lec/week

ACC 102 - Managerial Accounting

This course presents accounting as a system of producing information for use in internally managing a business. The course emphasizes the identification, accumulation, and interpretation of information for planning, controlling, and evaluating the performance of the separate components of a business. Included is the identification and measurement of the costs of producing goods or services and how to analyze and control these costs. Decision models commonly used in making specific short-term and long-term business decisions also are included.

Prerequisite: ACC 101

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: BUS 904

4 lec/week

ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the theory, concepts, and procedures underlying the preparation of external financial accounting statements and reports for corporate organizations. Accounting principles and concepts are analyzed and developed from a theoretical, conceptual, and historical environment and are then applied to specific business, transaction, and decision situations. Topical coverage includes: review of the financial accounting process; statements of income, retained earnings, cash flows, and balance sheet; time value of money concepts; cash and receivables; valuation of inventories; acquisition and disposition of property, plant, and equipment: depreciation and depletion; and intangible assets.

Prerequisite: ACC 102

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

ACC 202 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course (a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I) provides an in-depth analysis of the theory, concepts, and procedures underlying the preparation of external financial statements and reports for corporate organizations. Accounting principles and concepts are analyzed, developed, and then applied to specific business decision situations. A thorough examination of long-term liabilities, stockholders equity, accounting changes, financial analysis and financial reporting through both manual and automated accounting systems is developed.

Prerequisite: ACC 201

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

ACC 203 - Cost Accounting

A study of managerial and cost accounting concepts in planning, control and decision-making. Topics include product costing, cost drivers, cost-volume-profit analysis, activity based costing, budgets, standard costs, just-in-time applications and capital budgeting issues.

Prerequisite: ACC 102

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ACC 204 - Tax Accounting

This course provides an introductory study of the current federal revenue acts as they relate primarily to individual income tax theory and practice. Topical coverage includes the individual income tax return, gross income inclusions and exclusions, business expenses and retirement plans, self-employed and employee expenses, itemized and other deductions, credits and special taxes, accounting periods, accounting methods, depreciation, capital gains and losses, and payroll taxes. In addition to individual income tax theory and practice, an overview of partnership and taxation, corporate taxation, and tax administration and planning is provided.

Prerequisite: ACC 101

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ACC 205 - Accounting Information Systems

Accounting Information Systems examines the relationships and distinctions between accounting information systems (AIS) and the total management information system (MIS) environment, with major emphasis on computerized AIS. The AIS course will explore, in detail, several typical AIS application sub-systems, such as: (a) order entry/sales, (b) billing/receivables/cash receipts, (c) inventory, (d) purchasing/payables/cash disbursements, (e) payroll, and (f) materials planning/production.

Major themes throughout the AIS course will focus upon: (a) oral and written communication, (b) objectives and procedures of internal control, 8 typical business documents and reports, (d) proper systems documentation through charting devices, and (e) systems analysis and design methodologies. Additional specific AIS themes to be explored include: (a) The impact of emerging information technologies on the AIS and related systems; (b) The implications of business process re-engineering initiatives on AIS design, implementation, and management; and (c) Preparing to be, as an accountant, an effective user, evaluator, and developer of accounting information systems.

Prerequisite: ACC 102

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week.

ACC 207 - Accounting for Governmental and Not-For-Profit Organizations

This course covers the basic accounting concepts and issues associated with non-profit and governmental organizations. The primary focus is on municipal accounting applications, funds, governmental activities, and business-type activities.

Prerequisite: ACC 102

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

AGR 109 - Soil Science

The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamental principles of the nature and properties of soils including their origin, formation and biological, chemical and physical aspects. Soil dynamics, texture, structure, and soil reactions will be studied.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: AG904

3 lec,/ 2 lab hours/week

AGR 116 - Animal Science

The application of the sciences of genetics, physiology and nutrition to the improvement of the animal industries and an introduction to management and production practices. Includes animal breeds, breeding and selection, products and marketing; production technology and economics; animal behavior; and current issues in animal science.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: AG902

3 lec,/ 2 lab hours/week

AGR 142 - Principles of Ornamental Horticulture

This course is an introduction to the principles and practices in the development, production and use of horticultural crops (fruits, vegetables, greenhouse, turf, nursery, floral and landscape). Includes the classification, structure, growth and development, and environmental influences on horticultural plants; horticultural technology; and an introduction to the horticultural industries.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

AGR 201 - Plant Science

This introductory course covers the basic principles of plant growth. Including human and environmental influences and the theoretical and practical application of agronomic principles to crop production.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: AG903

3 lec,/ 2 lab hours/week

ART 100 - Media Arts

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary computer and design skills to begin a career in graphic design. Various personal and corporate projects on the computer will deal with the generation and manipulation of images as they relate to design layout and production.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 101 - 2-D Design Foundations

An introduction to two-dimensional design through the analysis of visual principles as they apply to design problems. Design problem solving in the studio and on the computer will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations, and critiques. This is a foundation course for commercial, architectural, and fine arts students. An introduction to color theory is included.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 102 - 3-D Design Foundations

The study of form and structure in three dimensions covering the relationships of masses, lines, texture, and color will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations, and critiques.

Prerequisite: ART 101 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 103 - Digital Photography

An overview of the basic concepts of camera control, lighting and composition for digital photography will be presented as well as shooting techniques for both still and video photography. File management, compression, image manipulation, and printing, of digital images will be included.

Prerequisites: None

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 105 - Motion Graphics

Motion graphics seamlessly combines various forms of media to create original and compelling visual art. In this course, students will gain a thorough understanding of input/output techniques, special effects, image compositing, and motion graphics. Students will also learn about the production timeline and graphical requirements of a multimedia project by demonstrating the manipulation of digital images in a studio environment. Students will also use 2D and 3D special effects to produce a television commercial.

Prerequisites: ART 100 or ART 230 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 106 - Introduction to Computer Art

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary computer skills to enhance their repertoire of available artistic media. Various projects ranging in content from design oriented to fine arts oriented will deal with the generation and manipulation of computer generated imagery, using the Photoshop program. Projects will build on design skills learned in ART 101 while emphasizing Photoshop as an artistic tool. Students will finish the course with proficiency of both skill and knowledge of the Photoshop software program.

Prerequisite: ART 101 and ART 113 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 107 - Digital Drawing

Students will learn how to see a three-dimensional space and translate it to a two-dimensional surface through traditional drawing techniques. Instead of traditional drawing media, however, students will use pressure sensitive pens, tablets and software to input what they see into a computer.

Prerequisites: None

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 113 - Basic Drawing I

An introduction to drawing through the use of various black and white media, with an emphasis on observational representation through descriptive and expressive means. Topics to be covered include: gesture, line, value, perspective, texture, and composition. Class sessions will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations, and critiques.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 114 - Basic Drawing II

An investigation of drawing through the use of color, with an emphasis on observational representation and thematic development through descriptive and expressive means. Topics to be covered include: gesture, line, value, perspective, texture, composition, color theory and conceptual exploration. Class sessions will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations, and critiques.

Prerequisite: ART 113 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 118 - Survey of Non-Western Art

A survey of the visual arts (painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, applied arts and architecture) in Non-Western societies including Africa, Islamic Middle East, South Asia, China, Korea, Japan, Oceania, North, Central and South America. Examines works of art as expressions of the ideas and beliefs of people within their cultural and social contexts. Designed as a humanities elective or requirement for the non-art major.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI:F2 903N

3 lec/week

ART 119 - Survey of Western Art

A survey of the history of art forms and aesthetic intentions of various cultures, designed as a humanities elective or requirement for the non-art major.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F2 900

3 lec/week

ART 120 - Prehistoric Through Medieval Art

This course is intended to fulfill the art history requirements for the art major, but is open to the public. Slide lectures stressing the major periods and styles in paintings, sculptures and architecture of prehistoric and ancient civilized cultures.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F2 901

3 lec/week

ART 121 - Renaissance Through Romantic Art

This course is intended to fulfill the art history requirements for the art major, but also meets humanities requirements as well. Slide lectures examine the major artistic trends that begin with the artistic Renaissance of the 15th century and continue through the Enlightenment of the 18th century.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F2 902

3 lec/week

ART 122 - Modern Art

This course is intended to fulfill the art history requirements for the art major, but is open to the public. Slide lectures covering the major movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States. Impact of the new technology on painting, sculpture and architecture.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F2 902

3 lec/week

ART 202 - Watercolor Painting I

An introduction to watercolor painting with an emphasis on observational representation and thematic development through descriptive and expressive means. Topics will include: the nature of the watercolor media, brush selection, support preparation, color theory, and techniques of application.

Prerequisite: For art majors, ART 101, ART 113 and ART 114 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 203 - Oil Painting I

An investigation of oil painting with emphasis on observational representation and thematic development through descriptive and expressive means. Topics to be covered include: composition, color theory and conceptual exploration. Class sessions will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations and critiques.

Prerequisite: For art majors, ART 101, ART 113 and ART 114 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 204 - Oil Painting II

A further investigation of oil painting with emphasis on observational representation and thematic development through descriptive and expressive means. Topics to be covered include: preparation of painting surfaces, creation and use of various painting mediums, composition, color theory and conceptual exploration. Class sessions will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations and critiques.

Prerequisite: ART 203 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 213 - Life Drawing I

An introduction to drawing the human figure through the use of various black and white media. Topics to be covered include: basic drawing concepts, structural anatomy, proportions, movement and pictorial form.

Prerequisite: ART 101 and ART 113

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 214 - Life Drawing II

An exploration of figure drawing through the use of various color media. Topics to be covered include: basic drawing concepts, structural anatomy, proportions, movement and pictorial form.

Prerequisite: ART 101, ART 113 and ART 213

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 225 - Photography I

To provide an overview of the basic concepts of black and white photography and to provide an introduction to photographic equipment. selection and use. To introduce basic photographic techniques and image processing (wet and/or digital), film development, print enlargements, finishing and mounting techniques. Students will gain an understanding in how to solve Visual Problems through their photographic experiences, making photographs as a tool for learning and possible consideration for employment in the photographic field and to develop an appreciation of photography as an art form. A brief overview of the history of photography will be covered.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 230 - Graphic Design I

This course is designed to provide the students with the necessary computer and design skills to begin a career in graphic design. Various personal and corporate projects on the computer will deal with the generation and manipulation of design images as they relate to layout and production.

Prerequisite: ART 101 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 231 - Graphic Design II

Fundamentals of advertising and design. Students continue with advanced studies of design principles, research and formats and layout, and create advertising and editorial designs for magazines and books. Computer graphics software will be used.

Prerequisite: ART 230 or ART 100 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 236 - Film and Video

The course will cover both the production of video and sound and how to use the medium as a communication tool. Students taking this course will be introduced to what is required for a career in video and audio media communications and methods to create video programming at a professional level.

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 230 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 237 - Image and Sound Recording

Production techniques for digital photography, videography, and sound recording will be presented. Advanced principles of lighting and camera control for still and video image acquisition will be examined as well as sound recording for video. Emphasis will be on composition, camera skills, sound recording and mixing that make the product more flattering, more marketable, and more creative.

Prerequisite: ART 103

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 238 - Interactive Media Design

Students will learn how sound, images, text and animation work together dynamically to entertain and educate. Students will continue with advanced studies of design principles and apply them to design of web sites. CD and DVD ROMs, kiosks, and mobile media to advertising and product marketing.

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 230.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 250 - Sculpture I

An introduction to the basic tools, techniques, materials and thought processes that go into the creation of sculpture. Participants will have the opportunity to create works using techniques such as assemblage, carving, construction, clay modeling, plaster casting, and soldering.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 251 - Sculpture II

Three-dimensional form as a means of expression will be explored through a variety of materials. Concepts of volume and mass, positive and negative space, surface texture and line will be emphasized in producing a unified work of art.

Prerequisite: ART 250 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ART 271 - Portfolio and Professional Art Practices

Instruction in and preparation of a digital visual portfolio with accompanying written documentation for application to four-year universities, professional art shows and job applications within the art field. Preparation of personal work and written documentation for exhibition purposes culminating in a student prepared group exhibition in the college gallery.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course is for Art Majors.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

ART 299 - Topics/Issues in Graphic Design

Each topic/issue will provide students with the opportunity to further develop principles and concepts relating to a specific area of graphic design. Since topics/issues will vary, specific objectives and a detailed outline for each unit will be approved by the department prior to the semester it is offered. Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record

Prerequisite: None

1 to 4 Semester hour(s)

1-4 lec/week

BIO 103 - Introductory Biology

An introduction to fundamental principles of biology including: nature of science, basic chemistry, the organization, structure and function of organisms, cell division, reproduction, genetics, evolution and ecology. The course is designed for the student with minimal science background. This course will satisfy science requirements for A.A., A.S. transfer, and A.A.S. degree students. (For non-science majors.) Credit will not be awarded for both BIO 103 and BIO 104.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: L1 900L

3 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 104 - Introductory Biology

An introduction to fundamental principles of biology including: nature of science, basic chemistry, the organization, structure and function of organisms, cell division, reproduction, genetics, evolution and ecology. The course is designed for the student with minimal science background. This course will satisfy science requirements for A.A., A.S. transfer, and A.A.S. degree students. (For non-science majors.) Credit will not be awarded for both BIO 104 and BIO 103.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: L1 900

3 lec/week

BIO 105 - Principles of Biology

A survey of the basic principles of biology including nature of science, cells, structure and function of organisms, genetics, evolution and ecology. This course is designed to satisfy the biology requirement for general education and vocation-occupational curriculum majors. It provides a basis for understanding principles common to all major fields of biology for the science or professional major. This course along with BIO 123 (Introduction to Botany) and BIO 131 (General Zoology) is part of the three semester sequence that satisfies the IAI 910 Biology requirement. Students who have completed BIO 105 with a grade of "C" or better will not receive credit for BIO 103 or BIO 104.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: L1 910L, BIO 910

4 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 108 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology

A study of introductory chemistry, cells, tissues, and structure and function of organ systems including: digestive, respiratory, reproductive, urogenital, cardiovascular-lymphatic, musculoskeletal, nervous, immune, and endocrine systems.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 109 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

A study of introductory chemistry, cells, metabolic processes, the organization of tissues, the skeletal system, joints and articulation, the integumentary system, micro and macro organization of the nervous system, and somatic and special senses.

Prerequisites: BIO 105 or BIO 108 with a grade of C or higher OR two years of high school biology with a C or higher within the last five years AND CHE 102 or CHE 103 or CHE 105 with a grade of C or higher OR one year of high school chemistry with a grade of C or higher within the last five years.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 110 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 109. BIO 110 is the study of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune, lymphatic, and reproductive systems. Additionally, electrolyte, pH, and water balance and human development will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BIO 109 with a grade of C.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 111 - Introductory Microbiology

A study of the chemistry, structure, metabolism, growth, genetics, ecology, and disease causing abilities of microorganisms. Intensive laboratory exercises will stress aseptic technique, culturing, isolation and microorganism identification using a wide variety of diagnostic procedures.

Prerequisite: BIO 105 with a grade of C or higher or BIO 108 with a grade of C, or higher or BIO 109 with a grade of C, or permission of instructor.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 3 lab/week

BIO 120 - Environmental Health

An examination of the environmental effects on human physiological systems, resulting in diverse problems such as heart disease, cancer, and other health related concerns. This course is designed to assist the student in making informed, responsible decisions affecting personal and environmental wellness.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BIO 123 - Introduction to Botany

Activities, structure, methods of reproduction, relationships and uses of major types of plant life, with emphasis on flowering plants. This course is designed for the transfer student in agriculture, liberal arts, general education and science majors. This course along with BIO 105 (Principles of Biology) and BIO 131 (General Zoology) is part of the three semester sequence that satisfies the IAI 910 Biology requirement.

Prerequisite: BIO 105.

5 Semester hour(s)

L1 910L, BIO 910

4 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 131 - General Zoology

An introduction to the principles of classification of animals, followed by a systematic study of invertebrate and vertebrate animals including their morphology, physiology and natural history. Concepts of evolution, paleontology and ecology are discussed. This course along with BIO 105 (Principles of Biology and BIO 123 (Introduction to Botany) is part of the three semester sequence that satisfies the IAI 910 Biology requirement.

Prerequisite: BIO 105 is required and MAT 115 or higher is recommended.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: L1 910L, BIO 910

4 lec, 2 lab/week

BIO 140 - Environmental Biology

This course concentrates on critical thinking needed to evaluate contemporary environmental issues with the goal of helping students make informed decisions. Basic biology, chemistry, geology and ecological concepts including biogeochemical cycles, population growth, biodiversity and evolution will be tied to environmental topics such as human overpopulation, climate change, pollution, natural resource use and alternate energy sources.

3 Semester hour(s) Semester hour(s)

L1 905

3 lec/week

BIO 270 - Topics/Issues in Biology

A seminar on a special topic or current issue in one or more of the biological sciences. No topic/issue can be offered more than twice within three years. (Topic to be listed on students permanent academic record.)

.5 to 3 Semester hour(s)

.5-3 lec/week

BUS 103 - Introduction to Business

Introduction to Business provides a foundation of knowledge in business including an understanding of the basic processes of marketing, finance, production, accounting, information technology, human resource management and the relationships of business to our society and government and the global economy.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 104 - Personal Finance

This course examines the various aspects, methods and techniques of personal financial planning. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and tools applicable to financial decision making, including the importance of opportunity costs, marginal analysis and the balancing of risk and return. Specific applications include the uses of cash flow statements, personal net worth statements, budgeting, borrowing, credit score management, banking, credit cards, insurance, and portfolio investments.

Prerequisite: None

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 105 - Fundamentals of Personal Selling

An introduction to personal selling for those students whose main interest is in the field of marketing. This course will also provide the necessary skills of personal selling to potential salespeople so they may develop their growing responsibilities more efficiently and effectively to manage the entire value chain within their own organizations, with their suppliers, and with their customers. Potential salespeople will learn the sound skills of partnering and communication in order to develop and maintain strategic alliances within the regional, national, and international business communities. Integration of materials from other business and non-business disciplines will illustrate the application of theories in the practice of selling to deliver total quality. Potential salespeople will examine various methods in which salespeople employ technology to learn about, to connect with, and to build relationships with customers.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 106 - Business Mathematics I

This course develops an approach to the study of the fundamentals of computational skills used in business. These computational skills may be employed in business/commercial decision making and in general quantitative business situations. Quantitative topics include reinforcement of fundamental arithmetic and mathematical processes, equations and word problems, percentages, decimals and fractions, product pricing and markup policies, bank reconciliations, notes and interest, payroll records, business inventory turnover, and insurance principles. Further topics include the study of business depreciation, business financial statements, business and personal insurance, corporate stocks and bonds, international business, compound interest applications, and business statistics.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 107 - Business Correspondence

An examination of the service provided by written communication in business through letters, memorandums and reports. Considerable attention is given to the principles and characteristics of effective letter writing and to the creation of documents through competency of objective method of writing.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 and OAS 104.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 112 - Human Relations

Stresses development of the individual and inter-personal relationships applied to business and industry with emphasis upon values, communications, problem solving, motivation and leadership. In addition, human relations skills and organizational behavior concepts are developed within modern organization environments to understand behavior, performance, learning, perception, values, and diversity. Communications skills, conflict resolutions, power, politics, ethics, and team dynamics are presented and analyzed within modern organizations. Organizational development principles such as organizational change, global diversity, productivity, participative management, and time as well as career management skills are presented and applied.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 205 - Principles of Management

Principles of Management analyzes the organizing, planning and controlling of business activities and the directing of people to achieve the objectives of business by studying the current management theories.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 210 - Marketing

An examination of the fundamental principles and functions of marketing, with emphasis on the tools and techniques by which goods are transferred from producer to consumer, not-for-profit marketing, consumer behavior, organizational buying behavior and the relation of marketing to the economic and business structure.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 211 - Introduction to International Business

This course provides a survey of the world of international business. Topics of study include business operations in different cultures, the impact of geography upon business operations, an understanding of why products are the same or different in countries, varying business practices, as well as the impact of the Internet upon international business. Problems and practices in international business management activities will be analyzed. The issues include American management techniques in foreign settings, comparative management among different countries and the complexity introduced by the management of international companies. The course focuses on international organizational functioning to help the student gain a diversity of views.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 213 - Retailing

Retailing provides an analysis of current situations, trends and problems in the marketing of consumer goods on the retail level. Emphasis is placed on retail store policies and procedures, store operations and customer satisfaction. The continuing evolution of retailing is presented as a global, high-technology business which employs sophisticated communications and information systems to manage operations. Retailing is the set of business activities that adds value to the products and services sold to consumers for their personal and family use. Retailing strategies are presented along with merchandise management techniques and store management concepts and principles.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 214 - Business Statistics

This course is an introduction to business statistics in which methods of collection, presentation and interpretation of quantitative data is studied. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of data with such topics as averages, dispersion, probability, sampling, tests of significance and simple linear correlation being studied.

Prerequisite: MAT 220 or MAT 221.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: BUS 901

3 lec/week

BUS 216 - Advertising

The basic principles of advertising, planning and management as it relates to marketing, sequence, including a survey of the major groups of advertising media (printed, broadcast, positive and point-of purchase media) and their application. Emphasis will be placed on the campaign approach to advertising program.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 218 - Supervision Techniques

The Supervision Techniques course analyzes the processes and structures to prepare students to become supervisors in modern organizations. Topics of study include modern supervision challenges, functions of the supervisor, skills of the supervisor, and the supervisors interaction with the organizations human resources function. Additional emphasis is placed upon the acquisition and development of modern supervisory skills in the workplace to include such skills as ethics, teamwork, diversity, goals, change, conflict, communication, motivation, leadership, organization, problem solving, and decision making.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 222 - The Legal Environment of Business

The legal environment law course is an introductory course to law and the judicial system. Topics covered in the course include federal law, securities, employment, labor relations, social environment laws, product liability and consumer protection.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 231 - Occupational Seminar I

A seminar designed to complement the student's initial placement in an approved working situation. Instructor approval required for enrollment.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in major field courses. Concurrent enrollment in BUS 235.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

BUS 232 - Occupational Seminar II

A seminar designed to prepare occupational students for permanent job placement. Instructor approval required for enrollment.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in major field courses. Concurrent enrollment in BUS 236.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

BUS 235 - Occupational Internship I

An occupational experience utilizing on-the-job training. All students are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours each week on the job. Instructor approval required for enrollment.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BUS 231.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 hours internship/week

BUS 236 - Occupational Internship II

An occupational experience utilizing on-the-job training. All students are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours each week on the job. Instructor approval required for enrollment.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BUS 232.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 hours internship/week

BUS 237 - Business and Managerial Ethics

This course will examine the basis of the ethical principles of utilitarianism, universalism, distributive justice and personal liberty. These principles will form the basis of ethical analysis of business and managerial cases and dilemmas in the business areas of accountancy, finance, information systems, marketing, management and international business. Professional codes of ethics related to these areas will also be examined.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 240 - Real Estate Transactions

A beginning course in real estate principles. The course is required for one to sit for the Real Estate Salesmans examination administered by the state of Illinois, Department of Professional Regulation. Course content includes: Basic financing and appraisals, real estate contracts and listing agreements. This course or a current Illinois Real Estate License is the prerequisite to all other real estate courses.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

BUS 270 - Topics/Issues in Business

Seminar on a special topic or current issue in one or more business fields. No topic/issue seminar can be offered more than twice within three years. (Topic to be listed on the student's permanent academic record.)

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-4 lec/week

CHE 102 - Introduction to Chemistry

A one semester general survey covering basic chemistry principles including topics in organic chemistry. In particular, emphasizing electronic structure and periodic law, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactions and calculations, acids, bases, salts, and organic compounds. Depth of coverage is designed to meet the needs for the general education requirement and of students in areas such as nursing, home economics and allied health. Credit will not be awarded for both CHE 102 (3 credits) and CHE 103 (4 credits).

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 902

3 lec/week

CHE 103 - Introduction to Chemistry

A one semester general survey covering basic chemical principles including topics in organic chemistry. In particular, emphasizing electronic structure and periodic law, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactions and calculations, acids, bases, salts, and organic compounds. Depth of coverage is designed to meet the needs of the general education requirement and of students in areas such as nursing, home economics and allied health. Credit will not be awarded for both CHE 103 (4 credits) and CHE 102 (3 credits).

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 902L

3 lec, 2 lab/week

CHE 105 - General Chemistry I

This course involves the study of matter, measurements, the periodic table of the elements, atomic structure, basic concepts of quantum theory, bonding, stoichiometry of compounds and reactions, solution chemistry, introduction to acids and bases, thermochemistry, the gaseous state, and basic concepts of the liquid and solid states. This class is for chemistry, engineering, pre-medical and science majors.

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHE 103 or CHE 102.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 902L, CHM 911

4 lec, 2 lab/week

CHE 106 - General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHE 105. The course studies the principles and laws concerning the structure and behavior of matter. The laboratory work is devoted to the theories and practice of qualitative analysis.

Prerequisite: CHE 105.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CHM 912

4 lec, 2 lab/week

CHE 201 - Organic Chemistry I

This course covers the following topics: bonding; molecular structure and properties; reactivity and nomenclature of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; stereochemistry; nucleophilic substitution and elimination reaction; infrared spectroscopy. Laboratory is required. Students should complete both CHE 201 and CHE 202 before transferring to another institution.

Prerequisite: CHE 105 and 106.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CHM 913

3 lec, 4 lab/week

CHE 202 - Organic Chemistry II

This course covers the following topics: Nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, aromatic compounds; conjugated dienes, dicarbonyl compounds, amines, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, phenols, NMR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry. Laboratory is required.

Prerequisite: CHE 201.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CHM 914

3 lec, 4 lab/week

CIS 101 - Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer information systems through a comprehensive study of the development, history, growth, and application of the computer as a tool of information systems. The student will gain a functional understanding of computer hardware, systems software, storage devices, telecommunications, database theory and applications operating systems, programming languages, software development, systems analysis and design, and management information systems. Issues of computer security, Internet and ethics will be stressed throughout the course. The student will be provided with a balance of real world applications and technical information of information systems. The student will participate in introductory computer laboratory exercises emphasizing word processing and electronic spreadsheet.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 105 - Introduction to Microsoft Windows

This introductory course is designed to introduce the student to the capabilities of Microsoft Windows in the context of a typical computing project. This course covers the primary components of Windows. This course not only explores the Windows sophisticated printing capabilities but also presents the many ways you can customize Windows to fit your own particular needs and tastes.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

CIS 106 - Microcomputer Spreadsheet Software

This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with the process of using personal computers to solve spreadsheet problems. In addition to providing the student with a working knowledge of the basic and advanced capabilities of spreadsheet software, the student will be exposed to the use of problem-solving techniques for situations in which spreadsheet solutions are appropriate.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 108 - Microcomputer Database Applications

This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with the use of Windows-based database management system to solve problems. In addition to providing the student with a working knowledge of the basic and advanced capabilities of a Windows database management system, the student will be exposed to the use of problem-solving techniques for situations in which database management solutions are appropriate.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 109 - Introduction to Microcomputers - Windows

This introductory consists of the study of microcomputer hardware, software, operating systems and communications, networking, Internet, systems and program development life cycles and their role in business decision making. The use of Internet, multimedia, security, and ethics will be emphasized throughout the semester. In addition, laboratory experience will be gained with a survey of Microsoft Windows and business microcomputer software applications programs in word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, presentation graphics, and Internet.

Prerequisite: None. Students having no experience with computers are encouraged to first take OAS 103-Keyboarding, or CIS 105-Introduction to Windows.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: BUS 902

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 117 - Introduction to Web Design

This course will introduce the fundamentals of Web Site and Web Page design. Students will create a design document to be used as a blueprint for creating a web site. Issues addressed will include audience, message, navigation, themes, text, graphics, accessibility and usability. Students will also be introduced to HTML and get an overview of the structure and function of the Internet as it relates to web site design.

Prerequisite: None, but CIS 109 is recommended.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

CIS 119 - Introduction to Web Authoring Software

This introductory level course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of creating web sites using web authoring software. Students will create web pages containing text, graphics, and internal and external hyperlinks. The use of frames and forms will be explored. Students will learn the basic procedures to publish web sites to a web server.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor. CIS 117 is also recommended.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 121 - Beginning Javascript

This course is designed to enable the student to write entry JavaScript applets. Students will become familiar with Java and object programming through successfully completing programs of varying difficulty. The student will be prepared to add JavaScript to their existing web pages.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 122 - Beginning Java Programming

This course involves problem solving utilizing Java as a programming language. Students will become familiar with Java object oriented programming. Problems will be analyzed and programs will be designed, coded, compiled and executed.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week, 10 students hours per week (Internet course)

CIS 123 - JavaScript Basics

This course is designed to enable the student to write simple JavaScript programs for use in web design.

1 Semester hour(s)

1lec/week

CIS 130 - Information Systems Management

This course is designed for students and managers who desire an overview of contemporary information systems management. Computer, telecommunications, and office systems management topics explain the issues of effective management of information systems activities and highlight the areas of greatest potential application of the technology within corporate environments.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 135 - Personal Information Management

A software application that is an effective personal information management program that helps you organize your busy schedule, keep track of contacts, and communicate with others. Multiple appointments can be kept and tasks accomplished in a day, week, or month. The application will assist in maintaining a full schedule by organizing the information in a structured, readable manner. Users easily can track meetings, e-mail messages, make to-do lists and notes with a particular contact.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or IND 105 or OAS 141 or OAS 241.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 136 - Intro to Photo Editing Software

This course is designed to introduce the student to basic photo editing skills, using a popular photo editing software package. Topics will include layers, selection methods, retouching of photos, and preparing photos for use on the web.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 137 - Introduction to Desktop Publishing - Level I

An introduction to desktop publishing in which students will learn to manipulate, edit, store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce business forms, charts, reports, newsletters, brochures and magazines utilizing the microcomputer.

Prerequisites: CIS 109 or IND 105 or OAS 141 or OAS 241.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 138 - Introduction to Desktop Publishing - Level II

An introduction to desktop publishing in which students will learn to manipulate, edit , store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce business forms, charts, reports, newsletters, brochures and magazines utilizing the microcomputer.

Prerequisite: CIS 137.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 139 - Introduction to Desktop Publishing - Level III

An introduction to desktop publishing in which students will learn to manipulate, edit, store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce business forms, charts, reports, newsletters, brochures and magazines utilizing the microcomputer.

Prerequisite: CIS 138.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 148 - Business Presentation Graphics

This course focuses on creating effective and attractive presentation media for business presentations. The student will learn the basics of a software package specifically designed for presentation graphics. In addition to providing the student with a working knowledge of the graphics capabilities of various software packages, the student will be exposed to the use of problem-solving techniques for situations in which graphic solutions are appropriate.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

CIS 150 - Fundamentals of Business Computer Programming

This course introduces students to programming logic, presenting the techniques of problem analysis and program design. Several business-oriented algorithms will be designed by the student using flowcharts, pseudocode and other programming logic tools.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 151 - Network Certification

This course offers a hands-on approach to computer networking. Students will be introduced to a variety of networking hardware and software. Students will examine the application of networking hardware and software, and install, configure, and troubleshoot end to end networks. The course will introduce the most popular and recent technologies. This course is designed to prepare the successful student for the Comptia N+ network certification.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/2 lab

CIS 152 - Introduction to Internetworking

This is the first of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI models, cabling, cabling tools, routers, router programming, star topology, IP addressing, and network standards. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking problems. In addition, instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance, and use of networking software, tools and equipment and all local, state, and federal safety, building, and environmental codes and regulations.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/2 lab

CIS 154 - Introduction to Internetworking Operating System

This is the second of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI models, Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber Distributed Data Interface, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, dynamic routing, and the network administrator's role and function. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking problems. In addition, instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance, and use of networking software, tools, and equipment and all local, state, and federal safety, building, and environmental codes and regulations.

Prerequisite: CIS 152.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/2 lab/week

CIS 156 - Introduction to Local Area Networks

This is the third of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, LAN segmentation, IPX addressing, and Fast Ethernet standards. Particular emphasis is given to the use of IPX access lists, full-duplex and half-duplex Ethernet operation, and the benefits of network segmentation. In addition, emphasis will be placed on Interior Gateway Routing Protocol and Virtual Local Area Networks.

Prerequisite: CIS 154.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/4 lab/week for 3 credits (75 contact hours)

CIS 158 - Introduction to Wide Area Networks

This is the fourth of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, WAN services, Frame Relay, and High-Level Data Link Control, Point-to-Point Protocol, and Dial-on-Demand standards. Particular emphasis is given to the use of Frame Relay operation, use and operation of Integrated Services Digital networks, and the operation and function of Point-to-Point Protocols.

Prerequisite: CIS 156.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/4 lab for 3 credits (75 contact hours)

CIS 160 - Intermediate Microcomputer Applications

This course is a survey of microcomputer applications software as productivity tools for business. Operating systems, word processing, electronic spreadsheet, database management, and business presentation graphics applications software will be analyzed and examined through a lecture and laboratory structured learning approach.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 162 - Network Administration

This course will prepare students to take the certification test for the Novell NetWare Administration course. Students will learn how to fulfill basic network administration responsibilities using Novell NetWare. They will learn how to set up and manage basic network services: how to create users, set up the file system, set up security, manage printing, and back up the server.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 109 or concurrent enrollment.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 164 - Network Design and Installation

Students will investigate the internal operations of NDS, become familiar with partitions and replicas, time synchronization, and console operations, practice installing and configuring networks and learn some principles for designing specific Novell networks.

Prerequisite: CIS 162 or concurrent enrollment or consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

CIS 167 - A+ Certification

This course offers a hands-on approach to microcomputer maintenance. This course will introduce a history of personal computer evolution as well as the most popular and recent technologies. Students will examine the personal computer; laptops and portable devices; current operating systems; printing & scanning techniques; basic networking; safety; and professionalism. This course is designed to prepare the successful student for the CompTIA A+ exams.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 168 - IT Essentials-Basic Hardware and Operating Systems

This course offers a hands-on approach to microcomputer maintenance. This history of personal computer evolution will be introduced as well as the most popular and recent technologies. Students will examine the bus architecture; CPU parameters and replacement considerations; memory; video systems; storage devices and input/output devices. This course is designed to prepare the successful student for the Comptia A+ hardware certification.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/2 lab

CIS 169 - IT Technician-Advanced Hardware & Operating Systems

This course offers a hands-on approach to microcomputer software. The history of personal computer evolution will be introduced. This course will examine advanced issues on installing, maintaining, upgrading, and diagnosing advanced hardware, operating systems, printing, and networks. Advanced topics on safety and professionalism are covered in the course. This course is designed to prepare the successful student for the CompTIA IT Technician Exam.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/2 lab

CIS 180 - Introduction to Internet

This introductory level course is designed to equip the student with the necessary tools to navigate through the network of computers comprising the Internet. It will cover a brief history and description of the Internet, focusing on the World Wide Web and communication components. Students will examine and configure popular web browsers. Introductory level security issues will be addressed, including firewalls and content restriction. Finally, students will explore Web 2.0 tools and discuss how they might be incorporated into a web site. .

Prerequisite: None, but CIS 109 is recommended

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

CIS 182 - Research and the Internet

This course will allow students to discover various avenues of using the Internet for research. Research may include topics of educational research values for elementary and secondary education as well as higher education. Students may discover effective methods of researching topics of interest in general, including weather, travel, and merchandise.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

CIS 185 - Introduction to Multimedia

This course will introduce students to multimedia. Students will produce projects using current multimedia production software. Students complete individual projects integrating several software products into a final project. Emphasis for the final project will be on the creation of a portfolio website that students may use to display their college class work, personal and professional interests, and submit as an online resume to potential employers.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 190 - Windows Server Fundamentals

This course offers a beginning, hands-on approach to Microsoft Windows Server. A beginners overview of the features, functions, upgrading, configuration and administration of the Windows Server will be covered. The course will focus on server hardware, software installation, configuration, managing groups, printers and other objects.

Prerequisite: CIS 151 or CIS 152 or CIS 167 (may be taken as co-requisites), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 191 - Windows Active Directory

This course offers a comprehensive, hands-on approach to Windows Active Directory. A vigorous overview of the features, functions, upgrading, configuration, and administration of Active Directory will be covered.

Prerequisite: CIS 190 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 192 - Windows Network Infrastructure

This course offers a hands-on approach to configuring the infrastructure of a Microsoft Windows network. An in-depth overview of the configuration of a Network infrastructure will be covered. The course will focus on the configuration of DNS, WINS, DHCP, IPv6, TCP/IP, Routing/Remote Access, IPsec, and Distributed File Systems.

Prerequisite: CIS 190 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 193 - Windows Server Administrator

This course offers an advanced hands-on approach to Microsoft Windows Server. An in-depth overview of the features, functions, upgrading, configuration, deployment and administration of Windows Server will be covered. The course will focus on advanced issues covering server hardware, software installation, configuration, managing groups, printers and other objects.

Prerequisite: CIS 190 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 194 - Windows Operating Systems

This course offers a hands-on approach to Windows Operating Systems. An in-depth overview of the features, functions, upgrading, and configuration of Microsoft Operating Systems will be covered. Topics will include management, networking, and upgrading Microsoft Windows in both a stand-alone and networked environment will be covered. The course will combine lectures, labs, videos, simulations and group and individual assignments.

Prerequisite: CIS 190, CIS 191, CIS 192, and CIS 193 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 195 - Windows Server Applications Infrastructure**

This course offers an advanced, hands-on approach to Microsoft Windows Server Applications Infrastructure. An in-depth overview of the features, functions, upgrading, configuration, and administration of Windows Server Applications Infrastructure technologies will be covered. This course covers Terminal Services, Web Services infrastructure and security, Media Server, Services server options, File Server, Print Services, network maintenance, and Simple Network Management Protocol.

Prerequisite: CIS 190, CIS 191, CIS 192, and CIS 193 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 196 - Windows Server Enterprise Admininstrator**

This course offers an advanced approach Server Enterprise Administrator. Enterprise Administrators are responsible for the overall server environment and architecture. Students will learn how enterprise administrators make key decisions about network infrastructure, directory services, identity management, authentication, security policies, business continuity, delegation of duties, and best practices.

Prerequisites: CIS 190, CIS 191, CIS 192, and CIS 193 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 197 - Security + Certification

This course offers a hands-on approach to network security principles. An in-depth overview of recognizing and protecting against risks and threats to an organization's electronic data will be addressed. The course will be delivered with a variety of videos, labs, text, lecture, and demonstrations. This course prepares students for the current CompTIA's Security + Certification Exam.

Prerequisites: CIS 151 or CIS 152 or CIS 167, (may be taken as co-requisites), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 203 - Visual Basic Programming

This course uses Visual BASIC in the Windows environment to solve problems. The student will analyze problems, design graphical interfaces, and design logical solutions. These solutions will be run and tested in the Windows environment.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 204 - Visual Basic Programming II

This course builds on the material in CIS 203 to teach structured programming using Visual Basic. In addition to reviewing control arrays concepts, file processing, and the use of multiple forms, it also covers exception handling, database manipulation, objects, polymorphism, inheritance and miscellaneous additional topics.

Prerequisite: CIS 203 or equivalent programming experience.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 206 - C Programming

This course is an introduction to problem solving using the C language. Technical problems are analyzed and programs are designed, coded, compiled and executed on a microcomputer.

Prerequisite: CIS 150 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 207 - C++ Programming

This course teaches structured computer programming in the C++ language. It emphasizes structured design, and procedural and data abstraction. It covers the fundamental control structures and data types in C++.

Prerequisite: An algebra prerequisite (either MAT 081 with a grade of C or higher or two years of high school algebra with grades of C or higher or appropriate placement score) and CIS 150 or previous programming experience.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CS 911

3 lec/week Course delivery mode: face to face

CIS 208 - C++ Programming II

This course builds on the material in CIS 207 in teaching structured programming using the C++ programming language. It emphasizes abstract data types in addition to exploring sorting, searching, and recursion.

Prerequisite: CIS 207

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CS 912

3 lec/week course delivery mode: face to face

CIS 210 - Systems Analysis and Design

This course focuses on the analysis, design, implementation and documentation of complete business systems. Emphasis on project management and general management of business information systems will be presented.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 214 - Computer Operating Systems

This course provides a theoretical approach to computer operating systems. New and old operating systems will be examined with emphasis on changes made in recent years. An exhaustive survey of operating systems in use in business today and how technicians maintain and support them will be completed.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 220 - Computer Accounting

This course covers small business accounting using computer software. Topics include creating a chart of accounts, recording customer and vendor transactions, processing payroll, and printing reports. In addition, setting up a new company is covered as well as advanced topics such as exporting to spreadsheet software and using the computer software audit trail.

Prerequisite: CIS 109 or IND 105 or OAS 104 and ACC 100 or higher.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 229 - Database Management Systems

This course provides a theoretical approach to database management systems. Topics included are data security, web-enabled systems design and programming for systems, large-scale databases and data warehouses, system requirements, database performance, and SQL for database queries. Physical and logical database design and models will also be examined.

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CIS 109 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 231 - Computer Information Systems Occupational Seminar I

A seminar designed to complement the students initial placement in an approved working situation.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in major field courses. Concurrent enrollment in CIS 235.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

CIS 232 - Computer Information Systems Occupational Seminar II

A seminar designed to prepare occupational students for permanent job placement.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in major field courses.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

CIS 234 - Intermediate Java Programming

This course is the second course in problem solving utilizing Java as a programming language. Students will become familiar with the more advanced areas of Java programming. Problems will be analyzed and programs will be designed, coded, compiled and executed.

Prerequisite: CIS 122 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week 10 student hours per week (Internet course)

CIS 235 - Computer Information Systems Occupational Internship I

An occupational experience utilizing on-the-job training. All students are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours each week on the job.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CIS 231.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 lab/week

CIS 236 - Computer Information Systems Occupational Internship II

An occupational experience utilizing on-the-job training. All students are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours each week on the job.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CIS 232.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 lab/week

CIS 244 - Advanced Desktop Publishing - Level I

An advanced course in desktop publishing in which students will learn advanced ways to manipulate, edit, store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce business publications with the software. Creating a publication, planning a publication, creating a new publication, placing a graphic, resizing and moving graphic in brochures utilizing the microcomputer. Students will be applying multiple character formats to text, positioning text within its leading, applying multiple paragraph formats to text, inserting and removing pages.

Prerequisite: CIS 139.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 245 - Advanced Desktop Publishing - Level II

An advanced course in desktop publishing in which students will learn advanced ways to manipulate, edit, store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce multiple pages, newsletters, master pages, columns, change line weights, work with graphics, and format text.

Prerequisite: CIS 244

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 246 - Advanced Desktop Publishing - Level III

An advanced course in desktop publishing in which students will learn advanced ways to manipulate, edit, store and plot both text and graphic information. Students will also learn how to develop and use artistic graphics necessary to produce business brochures adding color and using mail merge, long publications, publish electronically, create a letterhead, calendar, advertisement, poster template, brochure, newsletter, report, and exporting to PDF, utilizing the microcomputer. Students will work with scanners and digital cameras.

Prerequisite: CIS 245

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 250 - Beginning Linux

This course is designed to enable students to install the Linux operating system. Students will become familiar with general Linux commands and directory structures. This course will include an introduction to Linux editors and programming.

Prerequisite: CIS 151 or CIS 152 or CIS 167, (may be taken as co-requisites), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CIS 252 - Advanced Routing

This course is the first course of four courses designed to teach and train advanced routing techniques. It helps students prepare for the first of four exams needed for CCNP certification. Students will be required to do hands-on routing setup exercises.

Prerequisite: CIS 158 or CCNA Certification.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 254 - Remote Access

This course is the second course of four courses designed to teach and train remote access techniques. It helps students prepare for the second of the four exams needed for CCNP certification. Students will be required to do hands-on remote access setup exercises.

Prerequisite: CCNA or CIS 152, 154, 156, 158, and 252.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CIS 256 - Multi-Layer Switching

This course is the third course of four courses designed to teach and train network administrators; this course involves building multi-layer switching. The purpose of the building multi-layer switched networks is to teach network administrators how to build campus networks using multi-layer switching technologies over high speed Ethernet. The class will include an overview of SPT, bridging, switching and VLAN management. Students will also design, configure and troubleshoot multi-layered switched and routed networks. The class is designed to prepare students to pursue the CCNP examination. Students will be required to do hands-on multi-layer switching setup exercises.

Prerequisite: CCNA or CIS 152, 154,156, 158, 252, and 254.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 4 lab/week

CIS 258 - Network Troubleshooting

This course is the fourth course of the four course sequence designed to teach and train network administrators; this course involves network troubleshooting. The purpose of this course is to provide students with advanced classroom and advanced laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. This four course series is focused on providing the students with the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully pass the Certified Network Professional examination.

Prerequisite: CCNA or CIS 152, 154, 156, 158, 252, 254, 256.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 4 lab/week

CIS 260 - Systems Design Practicum

Students will apply their knowledge of software applications while working in a team. The team will prepare a plan for the creation of an information system in a business. Research for this plan may involve discussion with professionals and access through the Internet and Learning Resource Center.

Prerequisite: CIS 160 or concurrent enrollment.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 4 lab/week

CIS 299 - Topics/Issues in Computer Information Systems

This course will present current topics/issues of interest to the computer information systems profession. (Topic to be listed on students permanent academic record.)

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

CJS 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

The course examines the history, development and philosophy of the American criminal justice system. It includes discussions of the types of agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice and policies and procedures followed by those agencies, using a general career-oriented approach. Specific lectures include those topics such as criminal law, criminal offenses and offenders, and agencies responsible for the prevention and control of crime.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CRJ 901

3 lec/week

CJS 102 - Sexual Harassment, Assault and Rape Prevention

An exploration of the issues and management techniques surrounding professional harassment, personal harassment, and prevention methods to avoid a criminal sexual assault.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/2 lab/week

CJS 104 - Use of Force

This course provides hands-on training in use of the various forms of force within criminal justice. Students will be introduced to the use of force continuum, various scenarios within the career of law enforcement, and the appropriate responses, which include lethal and less-than lethal uses of force. To apply course concepts, students will engage in scenario simulations through use of the TI Training Use of Force simulator. Students will also be introduced to verbalization of police commands, as well as writing clear and articulated police reports.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

CJS 105 - Institutional Behavior in Corrections

The course covers aspects of prison life and correctional officer careers. Issues on daily prison interactions, sexual exploitation and relationships between correction officers and inmates are explored in detail. A substantial portion of the course includes trips to correctional institutions and/or discussions of these institutions throughout the state.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 (1.5 hrs) lecture

CJS 110 - Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals

Techniques for communicating facts, information, and ideas effectively in a simple, clear, and logical manner in various types of criminal justice reports: letters, memoranda, and administrative reports. Emphasis is on criminal justice terminology, use of English, and organization of information. Students will practice note taking and report writing as well as presentation of testimony in court.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

CJS 120 - Introduction to Corrections

The course is an introduction and analysis of punishment, custody and rehabilitation as administered by law enforcement, courts and corrections. Emphasis is placed on sociological study of the rehabilitation process. Includes visitations by practitioners and clients, as well as field trips to various types of institutions.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CRJ 911

3 lec/week

CJS 130 - Criminal Investigation

The guidelines and requisites for criminal investigators are defined and developed through a general orientation examining both preliminary and supplementary criminal investigations. Specific types of crime are examined in terms of statutory elements, modus operandi, evidence development and collection, sources of information, interview and interrogation, suspect identification, reporting and courtroom presentation and procedure.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 131 - Basic Crime Scene Photography

Camera, film and chemical procedures that enable the police officer to record photographic evidence for presentation as both investigative tools and courtroom display.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 4 lab/week

CJS 135 - Introduction to Criminal Law

The factors relevant to resolution and decision in the bringing forth of criminal charges are developed within the adversary system. The basic principles of criminal liability are reviewed, laying the foundation for considering specific offenses against property, habitation and persons. Special consideration is given to the criminal law within Illinois. CJS 101 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 200 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

Ethics is the study of right and wrong, good and evil. It involves all aspects of who we are-our minds, hearts, relationships with each other, and the intentions and motives for our actions. During this course students will become more aware and open to moral and ethical issues in criminal justice and students learn to develop critical thinking and analytical skills causing them to be more personally responsible. The educational process of ethics is recognizing how criminal justice is engaged in a process of authority, coercive power and selective discretionary authority. This course will develop whole sight in creation of a vision of ethical and moral standards within the criminal justice environment.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 208 - Juvenile Delinquency

The course is an analysis of the social and psychological factors of delinquent behavior. The practical application of theories of causation, prevention and rehabilitation is considered with regard to programs. The role of the juvenile police, corrections and probation officers is considered, as well as a look at the Illinois Juvenile Court Act. CJS 101 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CRJ 914

3 lec/week

CJS 214 - Correctional Counseling and Treatment

The course is an introduction to selected treatment techniques currently being used in American corrections. This course provides an understanding of the work of correctional treatment agents, their goals and profession, as well as an examination of the environments in which they work.

Prerequisites: CJS 101, CJS 105 and CJS 120 recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 225 - Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice

A practical information guidelines course for students seeking cross-cultural knowledge and sensitivity. The course stresses that those who are charged with the responsibility of public protection and service will demonstrate greater professionalism, both within the multicultural workforce and in the community they serve. It is recommended that CJS 101 or SOC 112 be taken prior to enrolling in this course.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 227 - Probation and Parole

Early development, types of service, administrative organizations, investigation and supervisory aspects of probation and parole within the legal structure of society.

Prerequisite: None. CJS 120 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 230 - Police Community Relations

An introduction and analysis of theories, techniques and programs involving police image and public response. Special attention will be given to problems of crime prevention, alcoholism, addiction and public safety.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 231 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure

Criminal evidence for police, types of evidence, criminal procedures in various courts, arrest, search and seizure, collection of evidence, discretion and related topics.

Prerequisite: None. CJS 135 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 232 - Police and Patrol Operations

This course is a study of the responsibility, techniques and methods of police patrol. This includes the areas of patrol distribution, selective enforcement, pull-over and approach methods, emergency pursuit driving, search of suspects and buildings, field interrogations, and procedures in handling police-called-for services.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 235 - Introduction to Forensic Science

Students in this course will study the techniques and technologies of the various forensic sciences as they relate to criminal investigations. Students will become fully aware of the legal issues that pertain to these activities and current forensic practices.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 236 - Introduction to Criminalistics

Physical evidence, collection, identification, preservation and transportation, crime laboratory capability and limitations, examination of physical evidence within resources of the investigator and demonstration of laboratory criminalistics to the extent supported by existing or available facilities. CJS 130 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

CJS 237 - Death Investigation

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the procedures of Scene Investigators, and the Medical Examiners Office, in determining cause and manner of death. Students will study the techniques and technologies utilized in modern death investigations, and become fully aware of the legal issues surrounding these activities.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 238 - Criminology

The course is an analysis of theories of criminology. Crime in relation to physical and psychological factors, to cultural areas, to the family and to other social institutions will be examined. Consideration is given to professional crime and white collar crime.

Prerequisites: SOC 111.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: CRJ 912

3 lec/week

CJS 240 - Police Administration

An analysis of the organizing, planning and controlling of public agencies. Includes theories on the directing of people to achieve objectives as well as a survey of administration and management patterns. The course introduces personnel policies, budgeting and planning as they relate to the criminal justice system. Utilizes a case approach in analyzing current management theories.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

CJS 250 - Criminal Justice Practicum

A supervised field experience designed to utilize and develop the students training and educational skills in a specific correctional, law enforcement, or social justice placement.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval of internship supervisor.

3 Semester hour(s)

5-15 lab/week

CJS 299 - Topics/Issues in Criminal Justice

This course will be designed to meet the special needs and interests of students on an occasional basis. Analysis of special problems in law enforcement, parole, probation, corrections and criminalistics which arise during the educational process or which require special in-depth consideration. Special emphasis on local problems and requirements. (Topic to be listed on students permanent academic record.)

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

CLS 203 - Phlebotomy

The study of techniques for obtaining blood samples by venipuncture. Medical and laboratory terminology, anatomy of the circulatory system, interpersonal communication, laboratory safety and laboratory clerical procedures are studied.

4 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lec, 2 lab, 7.5 clinic/week

CSS 100 - Student Success Skills

This course is designed to help students develop and refine successful learning strategies for their college experience. The course will provide in-depth review of how students learn and interface with the faculty and the institution as a whole. Key elements of the course will include educational goal development, effective use of college textbooks, note taking, and test preparation skills. This course may be repeated two times for students requiring additional development of learning strategies.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

CSS 110 - Career Decision Making

Introduction to careers and career exploration. Includes career information sources, career life styles, and career decision making. May be designed for specific career fields.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

CSS 111 - Resume and Interviewing Skills

This course will assist individuals with two components of the job search. First, the students will have an opportunity to develop a professional resume and cover letter. Lectures and World Wide Web sites will assist individuals with information and samples for this process. Secondly, this course will address tips on how to interview successfully. Interviewing is a skill that can be improved and this class will assist in developing this process.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

CSS 120 - Information Literacy**

Instruction in developing an effective research strategy incorporating traditional library based information resources, electronic resources, and the internet as these apply to academics, professional and personal pursuits.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

DFT 121 - Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing

This course is designed to present the principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) to industrial technical students and a variety of industrial personnel from the buyer to the machine operator. It includes the use and meaning of GD&T symbols on manufactured part drawings. The interpretation of GD&T symbols in feature control frames is studied.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

DFT 209 - Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting

This course is a continuation of DFT 208 - Basic Computer-Aided Drafting. More advanced features of AutoCAD 2000 will be introduced, including 3-D displays, attributed blocks, external references and paper-space and model space. Further study will be done into drafting concepts such as: isometrics, descriptive geometry, gears and cams, GD&T, and more focus will be given towards product design and production drawings.

Prerequisite: DFT 208 or EGR 103 with a grade of C or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

DFT 210 - Three Dimensional Drafting

This course teaches the student principles of solid modeling and the extraction of working drawings from the solid model. The latest version of AutoCAD will be used as the CAD software. The parts drawings will progress from models of simple objects to more complex engineering parts.

Prerequisite: DFT 209 with a grade of C or better.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

ECE 110 - Topics/Issues in Early Childhood Education

This course is designed to meet the special needs and interests of students on an occasional basis. Topics to be addressed may be from the areas of early childhood, biology, psychology, sociology, and emerging research

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

ECE 114 - Child Care and Development

This course provides an overview of the theory and principles of human growth and development from conception through adolescence. Content includes an in-depth study of the inter-relatedness of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Development is studied in the context of family, gender, culture, language, ability, socioeconomics, diversity, and society. Special emphasis will be on the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Gardner. Field observations are required.

3 Semester hour(s)

ECE 912

3 lec/week

ECE 115 - Principles of Early Childhood Education

This survey course provides an overview of early childhood care and education including historical and cultural perspectives, organization, structure, programming, and evidence-based practices. Professional and evidence-based practices of highly-qualified early childhood educators are outlined with an emphasis on their ability to enhance development and learning of each and every child between the ages of birth and eight. Considerations for diversity of culture, language, race, socio-economic status, gender, ethnicity, and ability will be included. Students will spend a minimum of 15 hours of observation in diverse early childhood settings.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 118 - Parent-Teacher-Child-Community Relations

This course focuses on the child in the context of family, school and community. An analysis of the contemporary American family will be discussed, with emphasis on the individual family interactions within the larger societal context. The course will examine the interplay of diverse cultures, lifestyles, language and communication with the role of school and other community institutions. Students will gain an understanding of their professional role in supporting practices that strengthen respectful family/child relationships through effective use of community and family resources.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 200 - Art and Music for Young Children

Students will be introduced to the role of art and music in a childs development. Their role in the curriculum will be explored and techniques for working with diverse students will be included.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 202 - Language Development in Young Children

Students will be introduced to the perspective, concepts, and methods of language development in young children. The relationship between the structure and function of language and the growth process will be emphasized.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 206 - Mathematics and Science for Young Children

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary to teach basic scientific and mathematical concepts to young children. Emphasis is placed on planning curriculum according to developmental levels, methods and materials, problems and issues and research findings.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 208 - Guidance Principles for Children 0-13

An introductory study of approaches, techniques and theories of guidance which can be applied as a means of measuring behavior growth or change. This course attempts to give the practitioner an understanding of behavior and social development upon which to base methods and guidance principles. Application of guidance techniques will be developed.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 210 - Early Childhood Education Seminar I

A seminar for students in the Early Childhood Education practicum experience. Focused discussion to integrate practicum experiences with theories, values and practice concepts.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ECE 250.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

ECE 211 - Early Childhood Education Seminar II

A continuation of Early Childhood Education Seminar I.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ECE 251.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

ECE 228 - Child Health, Nutrition and Safety

This course provides an overview of the health, safety and nutritional needs of young children and early childhood practices to ensure the health and well-being of each child in a group setting. Content includes roles and responsibilities of adults in meeting children's diverse needs, the promotion of healthy life style practices,understanding common childhood illnesses and injuries, meeting health, nutrition and safety standards, and planning nutritious meals that are appropriate for each child.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 240 - Observation and Assessment of Young Children

This course focusees on authentic, alternative, classroom-based assessment on young children and how to appropriately use standardized test infomration. The course will furhter provide the student with the knowledge and skills to interpret and use information gained to plan curriculum that is responsive to and supportive of children's learning and development. Students will have the opportunity to engage in assessment processes through means of classroom observations, providing each studenta with a stronger understanding of child development skills. Students learn about and explore a variety of age, individually, linguistically and culturally appropriate formal and informal assessments to gather and share information on each child's skills, abilities, interests and needs, birth through age 8. This class requires a 20 hour observation clinical component.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECE 250 - Early Childhood Education Practicum I

A supervised field experience designed to utilize and develop the student's learned training and educational skills in a chosen field. All students are required to spend six hours per week at an early childhood site as agreed upon with advisor.

Prerequisite: Students may register for practicum only with the consent of the SVCC practicum coordinator or the student's assigned academic counselor. Completion of first and second semester courses in the ECE suggested program.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

ECE 251 - Early Childhood Education Practicum II

A continuation of Early Childhood Education Practicum I.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and concurrent enrollment in ECE 211. Completion of first and second semester courses in the ECE suggested program.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 internship hours/week

ECE 275 - Curriculum Development for the Early Childhood Classroom

The principles involved in planning, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate, evidence-based curriculum for young children are studied. The course focuses on relationships among developmental theory, philosophy, practice and development of curriculum based on the needs and interests of young children including those who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. The analysis of a wide range of early childhood curriculum models is emphasized. Field experiences are required.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ECO 211 - Principles of Economics

A survey of macro-economic theory with emphasis on resource allocation in a mixed-enterprise economy. Concentration is on the operation of the market mechanism. The role of government and labor, national income determination and accounting, monetary and fiscal policy and the neoclassical synthesis.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S3 901

ECO 212 - Problems of Economics

A continuation of ECO 211 with emphasis on micro-economic theory. Concentration is on supply and demand, the theory of the firm, monopoly and imperfect competition, international trade and finance, economic problems of underdeveloped nations and contemporary problems of economic growth and stability in a mixed enterprise economy. ECO 211 is recommended.

Prerequisite: ECO 211 recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S3 902

3 lec/week

EDU 101 - Introduction to Education

Students will develop an overview of American education as both a professional and a public enterprise. Social, historical, and philosophical foundations will give perspective to an examination of current issues, policies and trends in the field of education.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 102 - Computer Education for Teachers

This course is designed to meet the needs of education majors. This course will introduce students to the fundamentals and skills necessary to effectively integrate computers into teaching. This course is designed for the student with minimal computer experience.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 105 - Preparing for Careers in Education

This course is required for students pursuing Associate in Arts in Teaching degrees and highly recommended for all students seeking teacher certification in the State of Illinois. This course should be taken during the first semester of college course work as an education major. The course introduces the student to certification standards and the course sequence required for education majors. In addition, students are introduced to cognitive skills needed for teaching, classroom motivation and management skills, portfolios, and strategies for securing entry-level employment in the teaching profession. 1 lec/week

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

EDU 210 - Diversity in Education

This course is designed to introduce preservice teachers to the basic principles and foundations of educating for diversity. The course will explore schooling in and for a global society. Emphasis will be on material evaluation and selection, curricular design, and the relationship between diversity, classroom procedure, and educational policy.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 220 - Students with Disabilities in School

An introductory overview of the field of special education in which students will be introduced to the various disability categories that occur in the population including an overview of characteristics of individuals with disabilities and the diversity of the population of people with disabilities. Services and methodologies will be examined, including federal and state requirements for eligibility. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking skills in regards to current controversies in the field.

Prerequisite: PSY 103 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 221 - Children's Literature

Students in this course will examine and evaluate reading materials published for children between preschool and junior high. Students will also explore the role that literature plays in children's growth and development and the ways in which literature can be incorporated into various settings.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 20 or above; suitable scores on the current English placement test, or grade of "C" or higher in ENG 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 222 - Teen and Adolescent Literature

This course is an examination of the role of teen and adolescent literature in school curriculum. Students in the course will evaluate literature created for the junior high school and high school student. The course will focus on understanding the literary development of the literature, the impact of the literature in the classroom, and incorporating the literature in content-area subjects.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 224 - Education as an Agent for Change

Education as an Agent for Change is designed to introduce students to the social forces influencing American education. Students will examine the social and philosophical foundations of American education, how educational traditions reflect American culture, and how schools can create social and cultural change.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 225 - Topics/Issues in Education

This course is designed to meet the needs and interests of pre-service and in-service educators. The topics of the colloquia will vary from semester to semester and will focus on issues related to teaching and learning.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

EDU 227 - Music for Elementary Teachers

Music methods and instructional materials for the elementary grades are taught through activities in singing, listening, creating, playing and moving to music. A portion of the work will stress the understanding of music fundamentals and the acquisition of functional facility at the piano.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 275 - Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology is an exploration of psychological concepts as applied to educational practice. This course emphasizes behavioral and cognitive theories, motivation, classroom management, development, intellectual functioning, achievement, assessment, learner differences, and cultural influences on teaching and learning.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

EDU 276 - Clinical Experience in Elementary Education

This 20-clock-hour experience is offered to help meet the practicum requirement for elementary, physical and special education in Illinois. Interns will observe students in a public elementary school under the guidance of a cooperating teacher. Emphasis will be on teaching techniques, classroom dynamics and the effects of student developmental status on behavior and learning. A journal noting these factors will be kept by each intern.

1 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lab/week

EDU 277 - Clinical Experience in Secondary Education

This 20-clock hour experience is offered to help meet the practicum requirement for elementary, physical and special education in Illinois. Interns will observe students in a public elementary school under the guidance of a cooperating teacher. Emphasis will be on teaching techniques, classroom dynamics and the effects of student developmental status on behavior and learning. A journal noting these factors will be kept by each intern.

1 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lab/week

EDU 278 - Clinical Experience in Special Education

This 20-clock hour experience is offered to help meet the practicum requirement for elementary, physical and special education in Illinois. Interns will observe students in a public elementary school under the guidance of a cooperating teacher. Emphasis will be on teaching techniques, classroom dynamics and the effects of student developmental status on behavior and learning. A journal noting these factors will be kept by each intern.

1 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lab/week

EET 107 - Introduction to DC and AC Circuits

A beginning course in electronics that provides the student with the fundamentals needed in advanced electronics courses. Instruction is provided in the basic laws of direct and alternating current circuit theory and the operation of electronic devices and circuitry. Emphasis is placed upon the operation of electronic test equipment which is utilized in practical laboratory application.

Prerequisite: MAT 074 with a grade of "C" or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 110 - Introduction to Digital Electronics

A basic course in electronic logic circuitry. This course will introduce the student or experienced technician to digital logic circuits. Basic logic elements such as AND, OR, NAND and NOR gates will be introduced and characterized. Combinational logic circuits will be designed and analyzed in the lab.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 207 - Advanced Circuits

An advanced course in circuit analysis and troubleshooting. This course will build on the fundamentals from EET 107. Circuit analysis and the use of schematics and test equipment will be examined from a technicians point of view.

Prerequisite: EET 107 with a grade of "C" or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 218 - Microprocessor Architecture and Applications

A technician level course in microprocessor circuitry leading to an understanding of systems utilizing VLSI, CPUs, and peripherals. The architecture of the MC68HC11 microcontroller will be examined and used as the vehicle to define basic concepts. Students will investigate input-output control, bus interfacing and memory architecture through programming and troubleshooting of MC68HC11 systems.

Prerequisite: EET 110.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 245 - Programmable Controllers

This course will cover both PLC programming and using the PLC as a troubleshooting device. Relay-type instructions, timer and counter operations, math and data compare instructions will be discussed. The course will also cover forcing commands as well as an introduction to the RSLogix 500 programming software. The primary PLCs used in this class will be Allen Bradley/SLC 500 series. More advanced programming instructions will be covered such as sequencers and shift registers and jump instructions. The course will use the RSLogix 500 programming software as the primary programming software.

Prerequisite: EET 110 with a grade of "C" or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 252 - Industrial Electronics

A study of industrial control systems based on an input-decision-output analysis. Special concern is taken in areas where small control signals must be amplified to meet high power output requirements. Some of the topics covered will include photo electric inputs, reduced voltage starting SCR applications, thermo electronics, hall effect sensors, solid state relays and electronic motor control.

Prerequisite: EET 107.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 256 - Technical Problems

This course is intended to fuse or gel many of the concepts, skills and knowledge that the student has learned during previous courses taken in the curriculum. Many of the assignments in this class will require knowledge that the student has acquired from previous courses.

Prerequisite: EET 245.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 261 - Advanced Programmable Controllers

This is an advanced course in programmable controllers. The course will be applicable to all modern industrial controllers. The course will cove PLC programming, including advanced prgramming instructions, networking instructions and applications. Products and processes used to collect infomation to document and analyze productivity throuth the use of accurate, verstile, and reliable electronic equipment that range from simple recorders to computer systems will be introduced. SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems and interfacing techniques using Remote Terminal Units (RTU) or other commercial modules will be covered. The use of robotics will be introduced.

Prerequisite: EET 245 with a grade of "C" or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EET 299 - Special Topics in Electronics

Application of electronics principles to specific problems through case studies, simulation, special projects or problem-solving procedures. No topic/issue can be offered more than twice in three years. This course is repeatable two times for a maximum of 9 credits. Topic to be listed on the student's permanent academic record.

1 to 3 Semester hour(s)

1, 2 or 3 lec/2,4, or 6 lab/week

EGR 103 - Engineering Graphics

This course is an introduction to engineering design and graphics, including design problems, sketching, dimensioning, tolerancing, multi-view orthographic representations, auxiliary views, section views, and working drawings. Students are required to use CAD in this course. Sketching and CAD techniques are integrated into the design process. This course is taught as a design studio class, which means that most of the time you will be working with other students in the classroom rather than listening to lectures. This course is also a project-based course with several case studies and one large, project. Students will work in design teams to analyze case studies and to design, prototype, and document a product.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: EGR 941

2 lec, 2 lab/week

EGR 250 - Internship in Engineering

Participation in a work experience in an area of engineering under supervision of both the College and employer. Internship objectives will be identified for each student enrolled. Students may enroll in one semester hour at a time for a total of four semester hours credit.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

1 Semester hour(s)

5 hours internship/week

EGR 270 - Topics/Issues in Engineering

Seminar on a special topic or current issue in engineering. No topic/issue seminar can be offered more than twice within three years. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-4 lec/week

ELA 090 - English Language Arts Lab

This laboratory course provides students an opportunity to work at an independent pace and based on individual diagnostics to demonstrate readiness for college-level reading level and writing skills expectations. It also provides supplemental direct instructional support for writing projects undertaken in English 101.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment with English 101 is required in the following circumstances: Required score on the current English placement test ; students who pass ELA 099 but do not pass the final skills check; or re-enrolling in ENG 101 (as the result of a D or F grade). This course may also be taken once as an elective. Note: Failing ELA 090 does not prevent a concurrently enrolled student who passes ENG 101 with a C or better from being considered as having passed that course.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

ELA 095 - Developmental Language Arts

This course focuses on developing reading and writing skills required to advance toward readiness for college-level coursework and to meet the needs of most entry-level workplace settings. The course covers fundamental comprehension skills and vocabulary building, as well as sentence-level fluency in composition and a review of grammar and mechanics.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 15 or below or required scores on the current English placement test.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec

ELA 099 - Preparatory Language Arts for the College Student

This course centers on developing the necessary reading and writing skills required for success in college-level courses. Students will be asked to demonstrate paragraph and essay development, emphasizing purpose, organization, and support, as well as sentence-level grammar skills. In addition, students will achieve college-level reading skills, including basic comprehension, analytical reading, and vocabulary strategies. Mastery of discrete skills will be demonstrated in a concurrent lab course; application of combined skills will be demonstrated in classroom activity.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 16-21, required scores on the current English placement test, or a grade of "pass" in ELA 095.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec

ELT 101 - Electrical Wiring

Students will be introduced to basic electrical wiring as it applies to residential occupancies, placing special emphasis on National Electric Code requirements. Students will develop an understanding of Ohms Law and be taught to wire series and parallel circuits; install single-pole, three-way and four-way switches, duplex receptacles and service panels; and troubleshoot circuits.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 102 - Small Appliance Repair

This course will familiarize the student with the proper procedures for repair of small domestic appliances. The appliances that will be covered are coffeepots, toasters, irons, vacuum cleaners, thermostats, water heaters, range hoods, blenders, fans and motorized hand tools (drills, sanders, routers, etc.).

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 120 - Fundamentals of Electricity with Applied Mathematics

This course provides basic electricity fundamentals, basic control strategies and electrical symbols. The class will provide the student with an understanding of basic electrical theory, schematic and wiring diagram symbols, motor theory, wiring and electrical troubleshooting. Conventional current will be used to define current flow. Applied mathematical concepts are incorporated into the course as required for successful understanding of objectives.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 259 - Industrial and Agricultural Wiring

This course is a study of industrial and agricultural electrical systems. Emphasis will be placed on installation and troubleshooting of motor and electrical distributions.

Prerequisite: ELT 160 or ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 260 - Farm Wiring

A study of farm and industrial electrical systems. Emphasis will be placed on installation and troubleshooting of motor circuit and electrical distributions.

Prerequisite: ELT 101 or ELT 160.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 261 - National Electric Code

A study of National Electric Code specifications with emphasis placed on proper installation of all circuits.

Prerequisite: ELT 101 or ELT 160 or ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ELT 262 - Electrical Controls

Provides the student with sufficient knowledge so that the person is proficient in the installation, servicing and maintenance of the controls used in industry and home.

Prerequisite: ELT 101 or ELT 160 or ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ELT 265 - Power Distribution

This course provides an introduction to the operation, design and protection of power distribution systems. Topics will include generators, motors, principles of operation and applied design of medium voltage power distribution systems and substations and the distribution aspect of the interconnected power system.

Prerequisite: EET 107 or ELT 160 or ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab hours/week

EMS 101 - Emergency Medical Training**

Students will be introduced to the roles of the EMT-B in providing emergency care under the direct supervision of a physician. Topics will include the medical/legal issues of emergency care, assessment techniques and procedures to assist with airway management, medical emergencies, traumas and protocols for communication about the transportation of emergency patients. The course includes clinical experience in the Emergency Room. This course has been approved by the National Highway Safety Bureau, US Department of Transportation. Students who successfully complete the course are eligible to take the Illinois EMT-B exam.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or GED equivalent.

7 Semester hour(s)

5 lec, 4 lab/week

EMS 103 - EMT Intermediate I

The student will be introduced into the roles of the EMT Intermediate in addition to legal and ethical aspects of Advanced Pre-hospital Care. There will be a review of Anatomy and Physiology as well as patient assessment skills and techniques. Emergency pharmacology will be covered along with venous access and medication administration. Advanced airway management skills will be covered as well as trauma management skills. Medical emergency care and assessment will be taught including respiratory, diabetic, allergic reaction, poisoning, overdose, neurological, nontraumatic abdominal, environmental, behavioral and gynecological emergencies. This course has been approved by the National Highway Safety Bureau, U. S. Department of Transportation.

Prerequisite: The student must possess a current Illinois EMT-B license and submit documentation that an EMS system vehicle will be available to accommodate field experience. Consent of instructor required. Not available for online registration.

7 Semester hour(s)

5 lec, 4 lab/week

EMS 104 - EMT Intermediate II

The student will be introduced to all facets of cardiac emergencies which include anatomy and physiology of the cardiac system, ECG Monitoring and dysrhythmia recognition, assessment and management of cardiac emergencies. They will also be introduced to obstetrical emergencies, neonatal and pediatric emergencies, and geriatric emergencies. This course has been approved by the National Highway Safety Bureau, U. S. Department of Transportation. Upon successful completion of this course and precepted field experiences, the student will be eligible to take a licensing exam as designated by the State of Illinois.

Prerequisite: The student must possess a current Illinois EMT-B License and submit documentation that an EMT system vehicle will be available to accommodate field experiences, the student must have successfully completed EMS 103 with a grade of C or better.

9 Semester hour(s)

5 lec, 8 lab/week

EMS 106 - Paramedic I**

Students will be introduced to the roles and responsibilities of the EMT-Paramedic in addition to the medical/legal and ethical aspects of the Emergency Medical Services System. Pathophysiology, pharmacology, medication administration and communication skills will also be studied as well as skill development. Specific clinical experiences will be required correlating with course content. Advanced airway management and skills will also be included. This course has been approved by the National Highway Safety Bureau, U.S. Department of Transportation.

Prerequisites: Students must possess a current Illinois EMT-B license and submit documentation that an EMS System vehicle will be available to accommodate field experience.

7.5 Semester hour(s)

5 lec, 5 lab/week

EMS 111 - Paramedic II**

Students will be introduced to patient assessment including history taking, assessment skills, clinical decision making, and communication/ documentation. Care of the trauma patient will be included covering the effects of trauma on all body systems. Specific clinical experiences will be required correlating to course content. This course has been approved by the National Highway Safety Bureau, U.S. Department of Transportation.

Prerequisites: Completion of EMS 106 with a grade of C or better.

8.5 Semester hour(s)

4 lec, 9 lab/week

EMS 116 - Paramedic III**

Students will be introduced to the pathophysiology, assessment findings, and treatment plans for the patient experiencing cardiovascular disease, neurological problems, endocrine problems, allergy/anaphylactic conditions, gastroenterology, urology, and toxicological problems as well as effect of environmental conditions.

Prerequisite: Completion of EMS 111 Paramedic II with a grade of C or better or licensed RN.

10 Semester hour(s)

5 lec,2 lab, 8 practicum hours/week

EMS 121 - Paramedic IV**

Students will be introduced to the pathophysiology, assessment findings, and treatment plans for the patient experiencing infectious/communicable diseases, behavioral emergencies, gynecological emergencies, normal or abnormal labor, neonatal conditions, pediatric illness, geriatric situations, abuse or assault. They will also be able to adapt assessment and treatment for those experiencing various challenges as well as the chronic care patient. Common complaints will also be evaluated as well as learning to deal with the multiple aspects of the emergency scene.

Prerequisite: Completion of EMS 116 with a grade of "C" or better.

12 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 18 lab/week

ENE 102 - Small Wind Energy**

This course provides an introduction to the field of small wind energy. Installation and theory of small wind turbines designed for industrial and residential use will be examined. Labs will provide students with hands-on experience installing and troubleshooting small wind installations.

Prerequisite: ELT 160

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ENE 130 - Photovoltaics

The course will cover the basic principles of photovoltaics and how to effectively incorporate PV systems into stand-alone or interconnected electrical systems. The course will cover site evaluations, operation, design and sizing, installation and advantages and disadvantages of different systems.

Prerequisite: ELT 120 or ELT 160 or EET 107 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ENE 135 - Renewable Energy**

This course covers the different forms of renewable energy and how they are used. The class will cover the basics of solar energy, solar photovoltaics, bioenergy, hydroelectricity, tidal power, wind energy, wave energy, and geothermal processes.

Prerequisite: ELT 160 or ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENE 140 - Solar Thermal Energy**

This course will cover the basic theory of heat transfer and the principles of solar energy devices available and how they evolved. The course will touch upon residential, commercial and industrial applications.

ELT 120 or concurrent enrollment in ELT 120 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ENE 145 - Geothermal Energy**

This course covers the theory of geothermal heating and cooling, design and installation. Heat transfer will be studied and the different modes involved in a geothermal system. Different designs and control strategies will be explored along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Residential, commercial, and industrial systems will be covered.

Prerequisite: ELT 120 or concurrent enrollment in ELT 120 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

ENE 150 - Energy Audit**

This course will cover the possible losses of energy in a building. Heat gains and losses will be covered and the best possible solutions from an economic standpoint. This is an entry-level course for the homeowner, business owner or plant manager who is looking to identify problem areas and possible solutions. Residential, commercial, and industrial processes will be addressed.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 091 - Developmental Composition

Review of rules and intensive practice in spelling, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. Study of the form and content of effective writing. Includes writing complete sentences and effective paragraphs.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 099 - Writing Skills

A basic course in effective paragraph writing centered on the common types of paragraph development, ENG 099 emphasizes paragraph unity, support and coherence, as well as sentence-level grammar skills. ENG 099 is a writing course for students with underdeveloped writing skills and for students seeking a review of writing skills.

Prerequisite: ENG 091 with a grade of C or equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 101 - Composition I

A basic course in essay writing with emphasis on exposition, ENG 101 stresses knowledge and application of the rhetorical modes. ENG 101 presupposes competence in grammar, usage, and mechanics.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 22 or above; suitable scores on the current English placement test, or grade of C or higher in ENG 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: C1 900

3 lec/week

ENG 103 - Composition II

An advanced course in essay writing with emphasis on formal research, ENG 103 serves to develop a proficiency in the collection and selection of data as applied to the completion of a formal research paper. In addition, students receive instruction in logic and reasoning, including the fundamentals of argumentative and persuasive writing.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENG 101 or its equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: C1 901R

3 lec/week

ENG 111 - Business and Technical Communication

Provides information on principles of written and oral communication specifically applied to business and technical fields. Assignments are designed to develop skill and practice in the use of these principles and include the writing of memoranda, business letters, instructions, informal reports and formal reports. Students are encouraged to tailor assignments to the specific careers they are pursuing. (Not applicable for humanities requirement.)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher. Because of emphasis on graphics and computer formatting, students are advised to complete CIS 109 or IND 105 or to have equivalent word processing skills.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 153 - Basic News Writing

Basic News Writing is a course designed to teach students the basic components of news reporting. In order to pass, students will demonstrate the ability to: write clear, concise, accurate, complete, balanced and readable news stories, define what constitutes news and how news stories differ from features and opinion pieces, effectively apply research skills for writing news stories, write effective leads, write a variety of types of news stories, gather and write news in an ethical manner and apply the laws governing journalists, demonstrate knowledge of AP Stylebook rules, and write under deadline pressure. Students will write information for mass audiences in print and electronic formats.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of "C" or equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: MC 919

3 lec/week

ENG 154 - Basic News Editing

Basic News Editing is an introduction to the principles and techniques of electronic editing, information management, and publication design emphasizing the editing of body copy and display type for maximum clarity and impact. On successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: effectively edit stories, rewrite stories without distorting them, write effective headlines and cutlines, demonstrate basic knowledge of typography, demonstrate the basics of publication design and the logic of packaging, and apply AP Stylebook rules.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of "C" or equivalent or ENG 153 (Basic News Writing) with a grade of "C" or equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: MC 920

3 lec/week

ENG 155-156 - Newspaper Production I & II**

A two-semester sequential course developing news writing, feature writing, layout and editing skills by participation on the staff of the College newspaper. ENG 155 will be offered only fall semester and ENG 156 will be offered only spring semester. Each semester enrollment carries one hour credit.

Prerequisite: ELA 099 or ENG 101 or consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 160 - Introduction to Literature

An examination of the elements of form, methods of analysis, historic periods, and theories of criticism of fiction, poetry, and drama.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 20 or above; suitable scores on the current English placement test or grade of "C" or higher in ELA 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 900

3 lec/week

ENG 201 - Fiction

An examination of the elements of form, methods of analysis and theories of criticism of the short story, the novella and the novel.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENG 101 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 901

3 lec/week

ENG 203 - Introduction to Poetry

By reading, discussing, and writing about poetry, students will encounter a wide range of poetic forms; learn the terminology that identifies elements of poetry (meter, rhyme, imagery, etc.); recognize their own roles as readers in experiencing the meaning of poems; research how poets' lives and diverse cultural surroundings influence and are revealed in their poetry; and explore various approaches to literary criticism.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 20 or above; suitable scores on the current English placment test or grade of "C" or higher in ELA 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 903

3 lec/week

ENG 204 - Drama**

An introduction to various methods of reading, analyzing and appreciating drama in the written form.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 902

3 lec/week

ENG 206 - Topics/Issues in Literature

An intensive study of literature based on a specific theme or subject or written by a selected group of authors. The topics of the colloquia will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in each semesters schedule. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 212 - Women and Literature

In this course the students will read, discuss and respond to the works of women writers. Students will study the works of women writers from different countries and different time periods as they trace the contributions that women have made to the field of literature. The course will provide an opportunity to explore the place of women in the development of the genres of fiction, poetry and drama. In discussing specific works from a womans perspective, students will examine the roles women have played in literature.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 911D

3 lec/week

ENG 215 - African-American Literature**

ENG 215 is a course of study, chronologically-organized, that seeks to develop an understanding of the African-American experience and culture as revealed in the writings of selected African-American literary figures.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 910D

3 lec/week

ENG 225 - American Literature to 1860

By participating in class discussion and reading original works, students will be exposed to and engaged in a broad and intensive study of American literature from the beginning up to 1860. Students will analyze and discuss specific themes, styles, and world views presented in the works. Students will be expected to read and analyze critical commentaries concerning the works. Furthermore, they will become acquainted with the relationships between the works and world in which the authors lived.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 914

3 lec/week

ENG 226 - American Literature from 1860

By participating in class discussion and reading original works, students will be exposed to and engaged in a broad and intensive study of American literature from 1860 to the present. Students will analyze and discuss specific themes, styles, and world views presented in the works. Students will be expected to read and analyze critical commentaries concerning the works. Furthermore, they will become acquainted with the relationships between the works and world in which the authors have lived.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 915

3 lec/week

ENG 227 - British Literature I

By listening to lectures and reading original works, students will be exposed to and engaged in a broad and intensive study of British literature from the beginning up to the Romantics. Students will analyze and discuss specific themes, styles, narrative structures and world views presented in the different works. Students will be expected to read and analyze secondary sources concerning the works. Furthermore, they will become acquainted with the relationships between the works and the world in which the authors lived.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 912

3 lec/week

ENG 228 - British Literature II

By listening to lectures and reading original works, students will engage in a broad and intensive study of British literature from the Romantics through the moderns. Students will analyze and discuss specific themes, styles, narrative structures and world views presented in the different works. Students will be expected to read and analyze secondary sources concerning the works. Furthermore, they will become acquainted with the relationships between the works and the world in which the authors lived.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 913

3 lec/week

ENG 230 - Minority American Literature

Students will read, discuss, and respond to selected works of Native American, African American, and Hispanic American writers. As they study these writers and their works, they will trace the contributions these various ethnic groups have made to the field of American literature. The course will be organized around the genres of autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher or its equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H3 910D

3 lec/week

ENG 270 - Creative Writing

An introduction to the principles, problems and processes involved in writing poetry and fiction. The course includes lectures, readings, and examinations and criticism of students work.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

ENG 271 - Creative Writing II

This course focuses on creating a community of writers. Students will engage in producing, presenting and publishing original works of poetry and fiction.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 101 - Basic Firefighter Operations-Module A

This Basic Firefighter Operations Module A course covers a portion of the total subjects required for certification, as well as incorporating a fire department atmosphere into the training. The program emphasizes developing the skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level personnel to become functioning members of a fire company. Module A will cover the following material: building construction; fire behavior; fire service organization; firefighter safety; communication; self-contained breathing apparatus; fire extinguishers, ropes and knots. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Basic Operations Firefighter from the Office of State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified as an Advanced Technician Firefighter.

Prerequisite: FIR 100

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 1 lab/week

FIR 102 - Basic Firefighter Operations-Module B

The Basic Firefighter Operations Module B course covers a portion of the total subjects required for certification, as well as incorporating a fire department atmosphere into the training. Module B will cover the following material: forcible entry; ladders; fire hose; appliances; water supply; and ventilation. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Basic Operations Firefighter from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified as an Advanced Technician Firefighter.

Prerequisites: FIR 100 and FIR 101

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 1 lab/week

FIR 103 - Basic Firefighter Operations-Module C

The Basic Firefighter Operations Module C course covers a portion of the total subjects required for certification, as well as incorporating a fire department atmosphere into the training. The program emphasizes developing the skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level personnel to become functioning members of a fire company. Module C will cover the following material: firefighter survival; wildland and ground cover firefighting; protection of evidence for origin cause; fire ground search and rescue; fire prevention and public education; fire control; loss control; overhaul; fire detection; and alarm and suppression systems. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Basic Operations Firefighter from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified as an Advanced Technician Firefighter.

Prerequisites: FIR 100, FIR 101, FIR 102 with grades of "C" or better.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/1 lab/week

FIR 104 - Advanced Technician Firefighter

The Advanced Technician Firefighter is considered to be the senior category of firefighter within the fire company or department. The course covers the subjects required for Advanced Firefighter Technician certification. The program emphasizes the enhancement of skills and knowledge necessary for experienced personnel to further their skills within the fire company or department. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Advanced Technician Firefighter from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified in some of their other certification titles.

Prerequisites: FIR 100, FIR 101, FIR 102, FIR 103 with grades of "C" or better; or Certified State of Illinois Firefighter II or Certified Illinois Basic Firefighter.

5 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 4 lab/week

FIR 105 - Tactics and Strategies I

The Strategy and Tactics I course is designed for the Fire Officer who is responsible for commanding one to two companies at the fire or emergency scene, such as Company Officers and Chief Officers of small fire departments. Subject areas which will be covered are: company officer leadership; safety; pre-fire planning; fire behavior; building construction; fire fighting tactics; engine company and truck company operations; RIT Officer; and tactical exercises. This course is required for certification from the Office of the State Fire Marshall's Officer I program.

Prerequisites: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 106 - Fire Service Vehicle Operator

Fire Service Vehicle Operator is designed for engineers and officers of a fire department who, as part of their duties, are responsible for the safe operation of a fire service vehicle during emergency and non-emergency driving. The class covers common driving hazards, pre-trip inspections and driver training. This hour classroom program is combined with an AHJ-provided driving portion, lets the student prepare for OSFM certification completion. A minimum of a valid Illinois Class "B" non-CDL driver's license is required for the road-practice portion. SVCC does not offer the driving certification portion of this class.

Prerequisites: High School Diploma or Equivalent and valid driver's license. A minimum of a class "B' non-CDL driver's license is required for the road-practice portion.

1 Semester hour(s)

0.5 lec, 0.5 lab/week

FIR 200 - Management I

The Fire Service Management I course is designed to provide the Fire Officer or Fire Officer Candidate, who is in charge of a single fire company or station, with information and skills in supervisory practices and personnel management. Subject areas covered will include: the role and function of the company fire officer; basic management principles and concepts; leadership; motivation; order giving; discipline; and conflict resolution. This course is required for completion of the Office of the State Fire Marshall's Fire Officer I Certification.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 201 - Fire Service Instructor I

The Fire Service Instructor I course is designed to give the student the knowledge and ability to teach from prepared materials which are predominantly skills oriented. Areas covered include: communication; concepts of learning; human relations in the teaching-learning environment; methods of teaching; organizing the learning environment; records and reports; testing and evaluation; instructor's roles and responsibilities; teaching techniques; and use of instructional materials. This course is required for certification for the Office of the State Fire Marshall's Officer I program. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with certification as Fire Service Instructor I from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this certification before a firefighter can be certified as a Fire Service Instructor II.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 202 - Fire Prevention Principles

The Fire Prevention Principles course covers materials in the areas of fire inspection, investigation, and public education. Topics include: laws; codes; ordinances; life safety code applications; building construction; occupancy; inspection techniques; installed systems and water supply. Fire investigation concentrates on first responder support of the investigation process. The course is written to meet the professional standards set forth in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1031 Standards of Professional Qualification for Fire Inspector and the Illinois Office of the State Fire Marshall. This course is required for certification for the Office of the State Fire Marshall's Officer I program.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 203 - Hazardous Materials I

The Hazardous Materials Awareness course will provide first responders with the knowledge and skills to understand hazardous substances and the risk associated with them in an incident; recognize the presence of hazardous substances in an emergency; understand the role of the emergency responder at the awareness level; including site security and control; have understanding of the U.S. Department of Transportation Emergency Guidebook; realize the need for additional resources; call for appropriate assistance; and make appropriate notifications to the community. The course meets the requirements of the Illinois Office of the State Fire Marshall, the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, and the National Fire Academy. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification Hazardous Materials Awareness (HMA) from the Office of the State Fire Marshall. The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified in any additional hazardous materials subject area

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

FIR 204 - Hazardous Materials II

Hazardous Materials Operations course provides those who are or will be operating as a member of a fire department, law enforcement agency, EMS agency, emergency management agency, or other first responder agency, the basic skills needed to evaluate and work defensively at an incident involving the release of hazardous materials. The objectives of the course are to teach participants basic hazards and risk-assessment techniques for Hazmat and CBRNE environments; how to select and use proper personal protective equipment provided to the first responder at the Operations level; how to perform basic control, containment and/or confinement operations within the capabilities of the resources and personal protective equipment available; provide an understanding of the types of CBRNE and WMD events that may be presented to the first responder; and provide an understanding of the relevant standard operating guidelines and termination procedures. National Fire Academy certification can be pursued with successful completion. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification Hazardous Materials Operations (HMO) from the Office of the State Fire Marshall. The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified in any additional hazardous materials technician level subject area.

Prerequisite: FIR 203 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

FIR 205 - Management II

The Fire Service Management II course is designed to provide the Fire Officer or Fire Officer Candidate who is in charge of a single fire company or station, with information and skills in supervisory practices and personnel management. This course provides coverage in the areas of basics of communications, report writing, interpersonal communication, group dynamics, coaching and counseling skills, and performance appraisal. This course is required for certification from the Office of the State Fire Marshall's Officer I program.

Prerequisite: FIR 200 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FIR 206 - Vehicle and Machinery Operations

The Vehicle/Machinery Operations course is designed to acquaint the firefighter with techniques used in Auto Extrication. The focus of the course allows the participant to become confident with the various extrication equipment and tools. Emphasis will be on safety, functions of the tools, and different techniques to remove victims from auto accidents. All students will be required to furnish protective clothing. Emergency Medical Technicians are encouraged to enroll in the course, however, will not be eligible for OSFM Certification. CEU hours may apply. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Vehicle Machinery Operations from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this certification before a firefighter can be certified in any Technical Technician courses.

Prerequisites: FIR 207, FIR 100, FIR 101, FIR 102, and FIR 103, successful completion with grades of "C" or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 1 lab/week

FIR 207 - Technical Rescue Awareness

The Technical Rescue Awareness (TRA) course is designed for the member of a first-in-company. It will provide first responders with the information needed to identify the rescue situation, its specific hazards, and the initial company operations. Subjects will include: structural collapse rescue, rope rescue, confined space rescue, vehicle and machinery rescue, water and ice rescue, wilderness search and rescue, trench and excavation rescue. The members of the steering committee followed the guidelines of the OSFM and NFPA 1670 guidelines will be followed. This course is meant to provide the student a means in which to identify and properly react to uncommon, dangerous and difficult rescue situations. Further training is required for actual rescue operations and practices. Completion of course and additional requirements will provide the student with Certification in Technical Rescue Awareness from the Office of the State Fire Marshall (OSFM). The Office of the State Fire Marshall requires this course before a firefighter can be certified in any additional rescue subject area.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

FIR 208 - Building Construction

The Building Construction course for the Fire Science program will provide the student with information and details on how building construction relates to the fire service. The content will enable the student to identify the components of building construction related to fire ground operations and life safety. Construction and design structure elements will be shown as key factors when inspecting, conducting pre-planning fire operations, and fire ground operations. The student will specifically focus on firefighter safety and the relationship between building construction and dynamics of fire behavior.

Prerequisite: High School Diploma or Equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

FYE 101 - First Year Experience

This course is designed to facilitate the self-development of the student, and introduce students to the expectations of the college community. This course reviews the academic skills that promote success during their college career. Topics will include, but not limited to, identifying campus/community resources, test-taking strategies, career exploration/decision making, problem solving, literacy, and critical thinking. Students will also learn strategies for taking personal responsibility for their academic and career choices. (Students in good standing (GPA of 2.0 or higher), who have accumulated 16 semester hours or more prior to enrolling as a degree seeking student at Sauk are not required to take this class).

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

GEO 122 - World Regional Geography

A systems approach to the study of the cultural and economic organizations of human activity throughout the world. Emphasis is placed upon perception and utilization of environment with special attention given to types of production, circulation patterns and settlement patterns throughout the world.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S4 900N

3 lec/week

GSC 105 - Astronomy

This course presents an overview of the history and development of the grand themes in astronomy. It is designed for students who either need to fulfill a general education laboratory science course or who desire to explore the nature of the universe that they inhabit. The course covers early views of the universe, the development of scientific models and principles, the technological and analytical tools used by astronomers, the nature of the planets and Sun in our solar system, the birth, life, and death of stars and galaxies, the origin and evolution of the universe, and the search for extraterrestrial life in the universe. Credit will not be awarded for both GSC 105 and GSC 106.

Prerequisite: MAT 080 or equivalent.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 906L

3 lec/2 lab week

GSC 106 - Astronomy

An introductory survey of the universe which includes the following topics: peoples changing ideas about the cosmos; the motion of the stars, moon, planets, and sun in the sky; the physical characteristics of the moon and planets; the formation of the solar system; the properties, structure, origin, and evolution of our sun, the stars, and galaxies. Credit will not be awarded for both GSC 105 and GSC 106.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 906

3 lec/week

GSC 115 - Environmental Geology

This course deals with geology as it relates to human activities. It will emphasize how geologic processes and hazards influence human activities and how human activities influence our soils, water, atmosphere, the need for energy, waste disposal and environmental laws.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 908

3 lec/week

GSC 270 - Topics/Issues in the Sciences

Seminar on a special topic or current issue in one or more of the biological or physical sciences. No topic/issue seminar will be offered more than twice within three years. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

GSP 031 - Adult Basic Education (ABE) Beginning Literacy

The purpose of this course is to improve basic skills in language arts, reading, communication, computational skills (math) and writing of beginning level ABE students in order to help them develop their adult roles as productive worker, effective family member, responsible community member and lifelong learner through taking responsibility for their own learning. The goals of the course are to increase students' level of functioning in basic academic, employment and life skills. There is also a Citizenship/Government Component for this class. The purpose of this component is to help students become more productive members of the community by understanding the way government works.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 032 - Adult Basic Education (ABE) Beginning Basic

The purpose of this course is to improve intermediate skills in language arts, reading, communication, computational skills (math) and writing while incorporating real world learning experiences. This course will provide guidance to ABE students in order to help them develop their adult roles as productive worker, effective family member, responsible community member. The goals of the course are to increase students' level of functioning in basic academic skills necessary for life and employment.

Prerequisite: Completion of ABE Beginning or TABE Score 368-460 grade level equivalency 2 to 3.9

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 033 - Adult Basic Education (ABE) Intermediate Low

The purpose of this course is to improve intermediate skills in language arts, reading, communication, computational skills (math) and writing while incorporating career explorations content. This course will provide guidance to ABE students in order to help them develop their adult roles as productive worker, effective family member, responsible community member and lifelong learner through taking responsibility for their own learning. The goals of the course are to increase students' level of functioning in basic academic skills necessary for life and employment.

Prerequisite: Completion of ABE Beginning or TABE Score of 461-517 grade level equivalency 4 to 5.9.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 035 - Adult Basic Education (ABE) Intermediate High

The purpose of this course is to improve skills in language arts, reading, communication, computational skills (math) and writing. Development in these areas will support the adult learner in the areas of: productive worker, effective family member, responsible community member and lifelong learner. The focus of this course is to provide learning experiences which support the learner taking responsibility for his or her own learning.

Prerequisite: Completion of ABE Intermediate or TABE Score of 518-566/6-8.9 grade equivalency.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 037 - GED Computational Skills - Secondary Level

This course is designed for the adult who does not have a high school diploma and who requires a review of basic mathematical principles and concepts, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 041 - Adult Secondary Education (ASE) Low

The purpose of this course is to build college and career readiness skills. Development of these skills will support the adult learner becoming self-sufficient and promote lifelong learning. The focus of this course is to provide learning experiences that build critical thinking, reflective thinking, and problem-solving abilities.

Prerequisite: Completion of ABE High INtermediate or TABE Score of: reading- 567-595, Math- 566-594/ 9-10.9 grade equivalency.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 055 - ABE Career/Job Preparation

Designed for the student at the ABE level who does not have a high school diploma. Emphasis on guidance-oriented pre-employment skills specifically designed to prepare individuals to make career choices. The student is introduced to relevant topics leading to job preparation.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 056 - Occupational Knowledge

Designed for the student at the ABE level who does not have a high school diploma. Emphasis on developing an awareness of the role work plays on ones life style. The learner researches careers, job sources and completes a job application form and an interview.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 060 - ESL Beginning Literacy

This is an entry-level course that teaches English to adult students whose native language is not English. The focus is on an individualized approach to developing each students basic language skills related to speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Prerequisite: Enrollment is based upon student scores on any one or more of the following standardized tests, and/or the students inability to take the test due to a lack of English proficiency: BEST Literacy Scale score 0-7 or BEST Plus Scale score below 401or CELSA Raw score of NA

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

GSP 062 - ESL (English as a Second Language)-Beginning Literacy

This course is designed for ESL students who have little or no literacy skills in English or their native language. The purpose of this class is to introduce English language literacy skills such as recognizing and writing the letters of the alphabet, identifying sound and letter correspondences, recognizing and writing numbers, responding to basic commands, and answering and asking questions about familiar topics.

Prerequisite: BEST Literacy Score of 0-20; CASAS Score of 0-180.

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

GSP 064 - ESL High Beginning ESL

This is a beginning level course that teaches English to adult students whose native language is not English. The focus is on an individualized approach to developing each students basic language skills related to speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Prerequisite: Students are enrolled in this class based on any of the following pre-test scores: BEST Literacy Scale score 36-46 or BEST Plus Scale score 418-438 or CELSA Raw score 20-23

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

GSP 066 - ESL (English as a Second Language)-Low Intermediate

Students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills necessary to meet the needs of independent daily living.

Prerequisite: BEST Literacy Score of 64-67; CASAS Score of 201-210.

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

GSP 068 - ESL High Intermediate ESL

Students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills necessary to meet the needs of independent daily living and enable them to enter the work place.

Prerequisite: BEST Literacy Score 68-75; CASAS score of 211-220.

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

GSP 070 - ESL (English as a Second Language)-Advanced

This course is designed for ESL students who function independently in the use of English in routine and work-related situations. The purpose of this class is to increase students' fluency in language skills using complex structures. Students focus on academic reading and writing skills within a variety of topics.

Prerequisite: BEST Literacy Score of 76-78; CASAS Score of 221-235.

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1, 2, 3, or 4 lec/week

GSP 075 - Health Care Career Bridge Program*Pending ICCB Approval

The Health Care Career Bridge Program provides students with the opportunity to build knowledge of the health care profession while working to improve basic skills in the areas of reading, math, and writing. The Health Care Career Bridge Program is designed to fulfill two objectives:

  • help students fully explore the strengths, experiences, and personal traits and guide them in setting specific goals aligned to taking the first steps in attaining a job or career in an area of interest and-
  • help students gain a working knowledge of the U.S. health care industry while building an understanding of the working life of a wide variety of health care professions through contextualized learning experiences (hands-on experiences, site visits, and interactive presentations with health care professionals).

Prerequisite: Students must be at least 17 years of age and working toward or recently attained a GED. Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

1-2-3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 080 - Adult Secondary Education (ASE)-High

A class designed to help prepare adults for the following sections of the GED (General Educational Development) test; correctness and effectiveness of expression, interpretation of reading materials in social studies and natural sciences and interpretation of literary material, mathematics and the Illinois and U.S. Constitution.

Prerequisite: Completion of ASE Low or TABE Score of: Reading-596+, Math-595+/11-12 grade equivalency.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 083 - Knowledge and Skills Writing

This workshop is designed to help students develop and refine successful learning strategies for their college experience while focusing on basic education in the areas of English/Writing and research. The workshop will provide in-depth review of how students learn and techniques for applying learning skills to self-monitor and implement strategies for continuous improvement in the areas of English/Writing and researching. Key elements of the workshop will include development of information literacy skills, fundamental English skills, and writing an effective research paper. This workshop may be repeated as many times as necessary for students requiring additional development in the area of learning strategies.

Prerequisite: Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

1-2-3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 084 - Knowledge and Skills Reading

This workshop is designed to help students develop and refine successful learning strategies for their college experience while focusing on basic education in the areas of study skills and reading. The workshop will provide in-depth review of how students learn and techniques for applying learning skills to self-monitor and implement strategies for continuous improvement in the areas of study skills and reading. Key elements of the workshop will include educational goal development, effective utilization of college textbooks, note taking, and study skills. This workshop may be repeated as many times as necessary for students requiring additional development in the area of learning strategies.

Prerequisite: Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

1-2-3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 085 - ASE Career/Job Preparation

This course is designed for the adult at the ASE level who does not have a high school diploma. Emphasis on guidance-oriented pre-employment skills specifically designed to prepare individuals to make career choices. The student is introduced to relevant topics leading to job preparation.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 086 - ASE Occupational Knowledge

This course is designed for the adult at the ASE level who does not have a high school diploma. Emphasis on developing an awareness of the role work plays on ones life style. The student researches careers, job sources, and completes a job application form and an interview.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 087 - ASE Health and Safety

This course is designed for the adult at the ASE level who does not have a high school diploma. Emphasis on understanding general safety measures and maintenance of good mental and physical health.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 090 - Knowledge and Skills Math

The purpose of this course is to improve and advance student's knowledge and skills in math. Emphasis on study skills and self-management skills specifically designed to help students prepare for college or careers. Knowledge and skills help individuals develop pre-college or career readiness skills.

Prerequisite: Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

1-2-3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

GSP 098 - Bridges for Learning English/Language Arts (ELA)

The focus of this course will be to develop knowledge and skills necessary for individuals to be successful in college-level courses. This English/Language Arts (ELA) course will expose students to several different careers while learning to develop reading and writing abilities. Study skills necessary for successful learning will be a focus of this course. This is an eight week summer course which requires several hours (time spent practicing correlates to individual skills and abilities) a week of individual practice utilizing technology-based supplemental English and reading lessons.

Prerequisite: Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

GSP 099 - Bridges for Learning Math

The focus of this course will be to develop knowledge and skills necessary for individuals to be successful in college-level math courses. This course will expose students to real numbers, solving linear equations (including application), graphing linear equations and inequalities, and study skills. This is an eight week summer course which requires several hours (time spent practicing correlates to individual skills and abilities) a week of individual practice utilizing technology-based supplemental math lessons.

Prerequisite: Placement based upon approved Adult Education assessment measures.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

GSV 100 - Commercial Drivers License Regulations

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 (CMVSA) has placed more stringent requirements on licensing of all commercial truck drivers. This three-credit hour course is designed to deliver all of the needed information to take and pass the Commercial Drivers License General Knowledge Written Exams in the states of Illinois and Iowa. Along with the Commercial Drivers License requirements, units on log books and first aid training will be covered.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

GSV 102 - Commercial Vehicle Operation

Professional Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators not only need the necessary information to be successful, but they must be able to operate the tractor-trailer combination in a proficient and safe manner. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to become a commercial vehicle operator and develop the skills and techniques essential to the safe and professional operation of a commercial vehicle.

Prerequisite: GSV 100.

7 Semester hour(s)

14 lab/week

GSV 110 - Working in the Warehousing Environment

This course provides learners with an overviw of the functional and structural composition of warehousing and distribution centers. Topics inlcude product flow, warehousing processes, working safely in a warehousing environment, principles in running a business, workplace ethics and how employees affect the bottom line.

1.5 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 1 lab/week

GSV 111 - Warehousing and Workforce Skills

This couse provides training in the workplace practices that contribute to success on the job. Units in this course include: The Art of Effective Communication; Working Together; Positive Image and Interview Skills.

GSV 110 Recommended.

1.5 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 1 lab/week

GSV 112 - Warehousing & Distribution Process

This course provides learners with the knowledge and core skills associated with warehousing and distribution.

GSV 110 Recommended.

1.5 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 1 lab/week

GSV 113 - Warehousing Technology Skills

Warehousing technology skills are those practices important to working a technical environment. This course covers the the use of scanners and data applications along with the understanding of industrial controls, computers and automation.

GSV 110 Recommended.

2 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lec, 1 lab/week

GSV 114 - Representative Warehousing Skills

This course discusses mathematical concepts use in warehousing and distribution. It also focuses on powered material handling equipment and safety requirements.

GSV 110 Recommended.

2.5 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 1 lab/week

HIS 131 - Western Civilization to 1648

Origins and development of western civilization beginning with the classical civilization of the ancient world and dealing with the contributions of each major historical group until the emergence of modern Europe in the commercial revolution of the 16th century.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S2 902

3 lec/week

HIS 132 - Western Civilization Since 1648

A continuation of the subject material offered in HIS 131. The history of the social, economic, political and intellectual life of modern times; the French Revolution; the Napoleonic era, nationalism and imperialism, world wars; the problems of world cooperation; and evaluation of present world problems are studied.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S2 903

3 lec/week

HIS 221 - American History to 1865

Students will examine the first interactions of Native American cultures, European conquerors, and enslaved Africans. They will compare the Spanish, French, and English experiences in North America, and explore the events in the English colonies that led to revolution and independence. They will examine the constitution issues, political clashes, and social changes of the Federalist, Jefferson and Jacksonian periods. Students will explore westward expansion, immigration in the north, and the southern slave economy. They will consider the events of the decade of crisis that led to civil war, and look closely at the war and its major consequences. (Students cannot earn credit for both the HIS 223 and 224 sequence and the HIS 221 and 222 sequence.)

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S2 900

3 lec/week

HIS 222 - American History Since 1865

Students will examine American history from the Reconstruction Era to the present. They will gain an understanding of historical periods and events such as the Industrial Revolution, the Gilded Age, the Great Depression, the two World Wars, the Cold War, The Age of Affluence, and the Struggle for Racial and Gender Equality. (Students cannot earn credit for both the HIS 223 and 224 sequence and the HIS 221 and 222 sequence.)

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S2 901

3 lec/week

HIS 231 - Topics/Issues in History

An intensive study of one geographic region, period, theme, person, or other defined topic in history. Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be listed in the course schedule.

1, 2, 3, or 4 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3-4 lec/week

HRS 100 - E.P.A. Certification

The course will contain all the information needed for a technician to successfully complete EPA certification. This is required to work in HVAC field.

.5 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec/week

HRS 105 - Refrigeration Principles

This course covers the theories used in air conditioning, including the relationship between pressure and temperature, conduction, convection, and radiation. The student will learn to work with refrigerant and pressure enthalpy charts so they can acquire a strong understanding of principles to build upon.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HRS 114 - Sheet Metal Fabrication

The students will obtain a working knowledge of layout and fabrication of common fittings used today. The student will learn how to use the tooling in a sheet metal shop safely and efficiently. This is a basic class and does not go into advanced layout processes.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 3 lab/week

HRS 120 - Basic Refrigeration

This course will allow the student to become proficient in the use of tools and proficient in the correct materials to use for a given task. The tools will be specific to air conditioning operations for proper operations of components and system performance.

Prerequisite: HRS 105 or consent of instructor. Can be taken concurrently with HRS 105.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 130 - Basic Heating**

This class covers the basic residential forced air heating system. The class will address basic concepts involved in the combustion process for safe operation of a home forced air heating system. Furnace components and parts will be studied and how to properly hook components together for safe and efficient operation. The class will explore different furnace efficiencies and how they differ.

Prerequisite: ELT 160 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 160 - Heat Pumps**

This course will cover heat pumps and how they operate along with supplemental heat. The refrigeration cycle will be reviewed then the heat pump cycle will be presented. The heat pump cycle will be covered and how it benefits a mechanical system from an energy standpoint. Supplemental heat is a design aspect of this system and electric heat will be addressed in the class.

Prerequisites: ELT 160, HRS 105, HRS 120, and HRS 130, (HRS 120 and HRS 130 may be taken as a co-requisite), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 170 - Hydronics**

This course will cover hydronic heat and how it operates in residential, commercial, and industrial settings. The necessary control for a safe and efficient system will be covered and how to properly hook up and troubleshoot. Piping design and installation will be covered along with the advantages and disadvantages of different systems.

Prerequisites: ELT 160, HRS 105, HRS 130 (HRS 130 may be taken as a co-requisite), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 222 - Commercial Refrigeration**

This course covers commercial refrigeration for product and the necessary controls. The main component of the refrigeration system will be explained along with the additional controls needed in commercial refrigerators and freezers along with cascade refrigeration basics.

Prerequisite: ELT 160, HRS 105, HRS 120 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 225 - Advanced Controls

This course will cover controls in commercial and industrial settings including DDC and pneumatics. This is an advanced course and the class will look at different control strategies incorporated into building controls, and process controls. Large centrifugal refrigeration and large commercial boilers will be introduced into the control sequence for safe and efficient operation.

Prerequisites: HRS 105; ELT 120 or ELT 160; HRS 120 or consent of instructors. Can be taken concurrently with HRS 105 and 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HRS 235 - Load Calculation and Balancing**

This course covers load calculation of forced air and water flow for proper comfort and industrial processes. This is an advanced level course, dealing with load calculation, balancing water and air, and advanced psychometrics. Residential, commercial and industrial processes will be explored.

Prerequisites: ELT 160, HRS 114, HRS 120 and HRS 170 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HRS 260 - Installation**

This course covers the installation of equipment and proper startup of the equipment. This is an advanced class that requires complete understanding of tool usage, sheet metal fabrication, piping, and electrical controls. This class covers correct installation procedures and how to perform different tasks in a safe, efficient manner.

Prerequisites: ELT 160, HRS 114, HRS 120, and HRS 170, (HRS 170 may be taken as a co-requisite), or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

HSV 101 - Introduction to Human Relations

An examination of basic psychological theories to help students expand their self awareness as they explore their reactions to everyday situations.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HSV 110 - Introduction to Human Services

A small group experience emphasizing role playing, simulations and multi-media presentations to focus upon student exploration of personal values, goals and career plans in people-oriented professions. Course work will also include special topics of interest to various aspects of the human services field.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

HSV 120 - Introduction to Group Process

This course is a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Students are exposed to the nature and function of groups, group process, and professional and technical issues involved in social work with groups. The goal of the course is to integrate concepts and skills.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HSV 130 - Manual Communications I

A beginning course in manual communications as used by the deaf. Finger spelling and general sign language will be taught.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HSV 131 - Manual Communications II

A second course in manual communications that offers exposure and study of the various aspects of communication problems of the deaf child.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HSV 204 - Social Work Methods

Students will study the Ecological Systems approach practiced by generalist social workers to address problems of individuals, couples, families, groups, and various environmental systems. Utilizing the experiential method, students will practice techniques and interventions applicable to modifying environments, improving interpersonal relationships, and enhancing the individuals physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functioning.

Prerequisite: It is recommended that students complete SOC 200 prior to enrolling in HSV 204.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HSV 210 - Human Services Seminar I

A seminar for students in the Human Services practicum experience. Focused discussion to integrate practicum experiences with theories, values and practice concepts.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSV 250.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

HSV 211 - Human Services Seminar II

A continuation of Human Services Seminar I.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSV 251.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

HSV 250 - Human Services Practicum I

A supervised field experience designed to utilize and develop the students learned training and educational skills in a chosen field. All students are required to spend fifteen hours per week at a career education station as agreed upon with advisor.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSV 210. Completion of first and second semester HSV courses in the HSV suggested program. Students will be registered in practicum only by the practicum teacher or assigned academic advisor.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 internship hours/week

HSV 251 - Human Services Practicum II

A continuation of Human Services Practicum I.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and concurrent enrollment in HSV 211. Completion of first and second semester courses in the HSV suggested program. Students will be registered in practicum only by the practicum teacher or assigned academic advisor.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 internship hours/week

HSV 270 - Substance Abuse

This course is designed to improve knowledge about substance abuse. It will help the student understand the general phenomena of substance abuse, etiology, psychological and biological effects, specific abuse problems, legal, social and treatment issues. Students will acquire a broad overview of the field.

Prerequisite: HSV 101 or PSY 103 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HUM 112 - Film Appreciation

An introduction to film as an art form, emphasizing a study of the aesthetic and production elements of the medium, including narrative genres, directorial style, cinematography, acting and editing.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F2 908

3 lec/week

HUM 150 - American Ethnic Cultural Expression

The interdisciplinary study of art, architecture, music, literature, history and philosophy, which reflects the cultural identity of American racial and ethnic minorities.

Placement into ENG 101 (Composition I) or completion of ELA 099 (Preparatory Language Aarts for the College Student).

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: HF 906D

3 lec/week

HUM 210 - Introduction to the Humanities I

Introduction to the Humanities is the study of humanity and its involvement with the arts in society. It is a study of visual arts, music, literature, and philosophy beginning with the Greeks to the 20th century. With lectures, slides, performances, demonstrations, and videos, the student learns how the artist helps us to see that the "arts are a reflection of our world."

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 20 or above; suitable scores on the current English placement test or grade of "C" or higher in ELA 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: HF 900

3 lec/week

HUM 211 - Introduction to the Humanities II

This course continues the interdisciplinary study of arts and ideas with an emphasis on principles of analysis and interpretations. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course. Content details the multiple approaches to topics in the humanities (responding, interpreting, evaluating); the tools for analyzing cultural ideas and the arts; the steps of interpretation (observing, connecting, inferring, and concluding); the citation process (internal citation and works cited); and the research process, including finding and using primary sources as well as interaction with today's electronic media.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 20 or above; suitable scores on the current English placement test or grade of "C" or higher in ELA 099.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

HUM 213 - Topics/Issues in Humanities

This course will be designed to meet the special needs and interests of the student population on an occasional basis. Topics to be addressed may be drawn from the areas of art, composition, language, literature, music, philosophy, speech communication or theatre.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

IDS 298 - Independent Studies

A course designed for students desiring in-depth studies to augment existing courses. Independent study opportunities are available on an individual or collective basis. Individual projects are planned jointly by the student and an appropriate instructor, may generate from one to four credit hours (with no more than four semester credit hours or the equivalent in independent study to be completed for an associate degree program, and no independent study courses approved for the certificate level programs), are subject to instructor and department approval, and may be subject to prerequisites deemed appropriate in particular instances. Collective projects are planned and offered by an instructor as a special topics class within his/her discipline, subject to departmental approval. These projects may generate from one to four credit hours (with no more than four semester credit hours or the equivalent in independent study to be completed for an associate degree program and no independent study courses approved for the certificate level programs).

1 to 4 Semester hour(s)

1-4 lec/week

IND 101 - Certified Manufacturing Assistant

This course will provide the necessary skills for an individual to enter employment in a manufacturing environment at an entry level. Upon completion, the student will be prepared for on-the-job training in a specific area or may choose to enter a certificate or degree program for advancement to a technician level position. Students may take the course in two sessions.

6 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/4 lab/week

IND 102 - Basic Custodial Skills

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the present custodial methods being used to maintain facilities. The course will explore custodial equipment, use, selection and methods used to maintain buildings. Custodial care of public buildings, schools and large and small offices will be covered.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

IND 105 - Industrial Computers Applications

This is an introductory level course for students in industrial technology to explore the historical development of computers, their functional operation, classification, and software. Computer software usage in industry will be examined. The software will include: operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 108 - Introduction to CAD

An introduction to engineering design and graphics using the latest version of AutoCAD. Basic AutoCAD commands will be introduced and emphasized throughout this course. Development of technical drawing skills including: design problems, sketching, dimensioning, tolerancing, orthographic projection, sectional views, and other viewing conventions. The course will proceed from the basics of design and sketching to applications used in preparing detail and assembly drawings.

None

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/2 lab

IND 116 - Industrial Print Reading

This course is an analysis of blueprint and schematic reading of electrical and mechanical drawings. The students will learn the basics of technical math that will be used in trades. The students will build upon this base and apply the applications to blue print calculations and common practices in the mechanical trades for successful completion of the task at hand. The student will also need to be able to demonstrate how to properly read and make drawings to scale using a mechanical scale.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

IND 118 - Mechanical Systems

The course will contain all information needed for a technician, trades-person or maintenance man to successfully perform at a high level in their job. The course material will cover mechanical systems focusing on analysis of mechanical components, their relationships to each other, and failure prediction. General rigging will also be covered.

Prerequisite: ELT 120.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 125 - Machining and Manufacturing Processes

This course is an examination of the use and capabilities of the major machine tool groups, including foundry, their use in industry and the problems and properties of metal fabrication associated with each type. This is a manufacturing technique and basic machining course.

4 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 4 lab/week

IND 131 - OSHA Standards

Provides students with information regarding basic safety principles in industry. A brief overview of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will be discussed. The primary focus will be on OSHA regulations and standards that pertain to the construction and maintenance of industrial electro-mechanical systems.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec. week

IND 203 - Advanced Machining and Manufacturing Processes

An examination of the use and capabilities of the machine tool groups. An advanced course for students wishing to have almost a total machine shop knowledge for set-up, machine feeds, tool and cutter sharpening and electrical discharge machining.

Prerequisite: IND 125.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 207 - Beginning Computer Numerical Control

Beginning Computer Numerical Control is a course designed to help a person looking for a position in the metalworking industry. Course work includes basic techniques of programming various machines used in various trades and complete CNC programming for a Bendix controller.

Prerequisites: IND 125 or 116, or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 208 - Advanced Computer Numerical Control

Applies principles learned in IND 207 to complex uses of computer numerical controlled machines and explores the unlimited possibilities that such innovations are applicable to in everyday industrial fields.

Prerequisite: IND 207.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 214 - Industrial Hydraulics

A study of applied principles, practical features, installation, operation and maintenance of industrial hydraulic-powered devices.

Prerequisite: IND 116

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 216 - Industrial Pneumatics

A study of fundamentals of pneumatic power including applied principles, installation, operation and maintenance of industrial pneumatic-powered devices.

Prerequisite: IND 116

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 218 - Fluid Power

This course will combine the operating fundamentals of hydraulic and pneumatic controls and operations. Students will read and interpret prints using proper symbols and documentation. Students will be able to design and assemble a complete fluid power system using the correct calculations for proper sizing of equipment.

Prerequisite: IND 116 or IND 118.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 219 - Industrial Troubleshooting

Students will learn to systematically troubleshoot equipment and control systems used in industry. This course will start with analyzing troubleshooting theory and flowcharts and evolve into actual hands-on troubleshooting of simulated industrial machinery.

Prerequisites: ELT 160, ELT 262, and EET 245 with a grade of "C" or higher or competency test with a grade of 80% or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 220 - Topics/Issues in Mechanics and Repair

Application of mechanical principles to specific problems through case studies, simulation, special projects or problem solving procedures. No topic/issue can be offered more than twice in three years

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec, 2-4-6 lab/week

IND 239 - Industrial Communications

This course will introduce the fundamentals of industrial networks. Topics covered will include WANs, LANs, PANs, topologies, communication protocols, cabling, wired and wireless communications, and SCADA. Additional topics may be introduced to keep content current in this rapidly changing area. Lab activities will be included to provide "hands-on" experience with equipment.

Prerequisite: EET 110

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

IND 250 (1) - Industrial Internship

Participation in a work experience in an area of technology under supervision of both the college and an employer. Internship objectives will be identified for each student enrolled

Prerequisite: Twelve semester hours in major field and consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

5 hours internship/week

IND 250 (2) - Industrial Internship

Participation in a work experience in an area of technology under supervision of both the College and an employer. Internship objectives will be identified for each student enrolled.

Prerequisite: Twelve semester credit hours in major field and consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

10 hours internship/week

IND 250 (3) - Industrial Internship

Participation in a work experience in an area of technology under supervision of both the college and an employer. Internship objectives will be identified for each student enrolled.

Prerequisite: Twelve semester hours in major field and consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

15 hours internship/week

LAN 101 - Beginning French I**

A study of functional French with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple French. This course assumes that the student has no previous exposure to French language or culture.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 102 - Beginning French II**

A continuation of the study of functional French with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple French.

Prerequisite: LAN 101 or 1 year of high school French.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 151 - Beginning German I**

A study of functional German with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple German.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/2 lab/week

LAN 152 - Beginning German II**

A study of functional German with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple German.

Prerequisite: LAN 151 or 1 year of high school German.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

LAN 161 - Beginning Spanish I

A study of functional Spanish with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple Spanish.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 162 - Beginning Spanish II

A study of functional Spanish with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple Spanish.

Prerequisite: LAN 161 or 1 year of high school Spanish.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 163 - Survival Spanish I

The focus of this course will be on necessary vocabulary, terms and idioms used in 21st century United States work places. The Spanish studied will involve a minimum of grammar and a maximum of oral repetition and memorization of short essential phrases. Dialogues will be practiced and mastered involving everyday situations in law enforcement, social work, counseling and businesses where clients are frequently Spanish speaking.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

LAN 164 - Survival Spanish II

The course will extend drill and practice necessary to a worker in jobs requiring bilingual skills. The Spanish studied will go beyond elementary vocabularies in work-related situations. Some new attention will focus on past tense, commands, telephone communication and correspondence. Dialogues will be practiced stemming from student-related individual situations.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

LAN 201 - Intermediate French I**

A continuation of the study of functional French with emphasis on speaking the language. Practice in reading and writing simple French.

Prerequisite: LAN 102 or two years of high school French.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 202 - Intermediate French II**

Continued emphasis on expression in the language. Class discussion will be based on cultural readings, recordings, and film. Intensive grammar review with added cultural context.

Prerequisite: LAN 201 or three years of high school French.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 251 - Intermediate German I**

Continued emphasis on speaking the language. Class discussion based on the reading of selected short stories, plays, poetry and essays. General grammar review and composition.

Prerequisite: LAN 151 or 2 year of high school German.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

LAN 252 - Intermediate German II**

Continued emphasis on speaking the language. Class discussion based on the reading of selected short stories, plays, poetry and essays. General grammar review and composition.

Prerequisite: LAN 251.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

LAN 261 - Intermediate Spanish I

Continued emphasis on speaking the language. Class discussion based on readings in grammar review text and culture presentations for Spain and South America. Selected Spanish prose readings.

Prerequisite: LAN 161-162 or 3 years of high school Spanish.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

LAN 262 - Intermediate Spanish II

Continued emphasis on speaking the language. Class discussion based on readings in grammar review text and culture presentations for Spain and South America. Selected Spanish prose readings.

Prerequisite: LAN 261.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H1 900

4 lecweek

LAN 263 - Survival Spanish III

The course offers extensive practice in comprehension and speaking of Spanish. Mastery of intermediate level text materials and tapes provide cultural and idiomatic awareness and sound language review. Advanced repetition and conversation practice in the target language.

Prerequisite: LAN 164.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

LAN 264 - Survival Spanish IV

The course offers extensive practice in comprehension and speaking of Spanish. Mastery of intermediate level text materials and tapes provide cultural and idiomatic awareness and sound language review. Advanced repetition and conversation practice in the target language.

Prerequisite: LAN 164 or permission of instructor. Special condition: LAN 263 does not transfer to universities as part of a foreign language prerequisite>

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

LAN 299 - Topics/Issues in Foreign Language

Seminar on a special topic or current issue in foreign language. The topics covered will vary from situation to situation depending on the needs of the student population being served and the nature of the subject being studied. The specific topic covered will be listed on the students permanent academic record. The course outline must be approved by the academic department each time a different topic or issue is to be offered under this variable topic course label

1 to 4 Semester hour(s)

1-4 lec/week

MAT 070 - Fundamentals of Mathematics

This is a course in basic mathematical skills and concepts. Emphasis is on the development and review of computational and operational skills with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, ratio and proportion, measurement systems, geometric shapes, and an introduction to working with variables and solving one-step algebraic equations.

Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MAT 072 - Pre-Algebra

Designed to prepare students for elementary algebra. Topics include a review of arithmetic operations and mathematical principles, signed numbers, exponents, linear equations, polynomial operations, elementary graphing, and problems of application.

Prerequisite: MAT 070 with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MAT 074 - Elementary Algebra

This is an introductory course in algebra. Topics include: integers and operations, the real number system, expressions and exponents, linear equations and inequalities, graphs of equations, polynomials and factoring, slope and equations of lines, systems of linear equations, rational expressions, radicals, and quadratic equations.

Prerequisite: MAT 072 with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 075 - Beginning Algebra

This is an introductory course in algebra. Topics include: Integers and operations, the real number system, expressions and exponents, linear equations and inequalities, graphs of equations, polynomials and factoring, slope and equations of lines, systems of linear equations, and quadratic equations. Credit earned does not count toward any degree, nor does it transfer. A scientific calculator will be used in this course.

Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score, or completion of MAT 070 or MAT 072 with a grade of "C" or better.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 076 - Geometry

A study of points, lines, planes, angles, and other geometric figures. Properties of size and shape are investigated through observation and deduction. Topics include proof and logic, parallels and polygons, congruence and similarity, inequalities, right triangles, circles, area and volume. Compass/straightedge constructions and locus problems are also included. This course is designed for students that have not taken high school geometry or for those who need to relearn the basic concepts of geometry.

Prerequisite: MAT 074 or MAT 075 or higher level math course with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score, or one year of high school algebra with grades of C or higher or one year of Math 1 with grades of C or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 080 - Intermediate Algebra

This course assumes familiarity with material in MAT 074. Topics extended to an intermediate level include: real numbers and expressions, equations and inequalities, graphing methods, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. New topics include: functions and their graphs, radicals and complex numbers, quadratic and rational inequalities, graphs of second degree equations and variation.

Prerequisite: MAT 074 with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score, or one year of high school algebra with grades of C or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 081 - Intermediate Algebra

This is an intermediate level algebra course; the following topics will be extended to an intermediate level of competency; real numbers and expressions, equations and inequalities, graphing methods, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. New topics include: functions and their graphs, radicals and complex numbers, rational expressions, quadratic equations, quadratic and rational inequalities, graphs of second degree equations, and variation.

Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or completion of MAT 074 or MAT 075 with a grade of "C" or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 106 - Applied Mathematics

Applied mathematics is a fundamental course for students in technical and career programs. The course includes fundamental mathematics, algebra, geometry, right triangle trigonometry, business mathematics, and statistical concepts which are applied to the solution of practical problems. Scientific notation, metrics and use of the calculator are also covered.

Prerequisite: MAT 075 with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score, or one year of high school algebra with grades of C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MAT 110 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

The emphasis of this course is placed on mathematical reasoning and problem-solving as it pertains to modern elementary/middle school mathematics. Topics include: basic problem solving, whole numbers and elementary number theory, fractions, ratios and percents, rational numbers, and real numbers.

Prerequisite: MAT 076 with a grade of C or higher or one year of high school geometry with a grade of C or higher and MAT 081 with a grade of C or higher, or two years of high school algebra with grades of C or higher or appropriate placement score.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

MAT 111 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

This course is a continuation of MAT 110 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. Topics include: real numbers, introductory probability and statistics, geometry measurement, coordinate geometry and transformations.

Prerequisite: MAT 110 with a grade of C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 903

2 lec, 2 lab/week

MAT 115 - Principles of Modern Mathematics

An investigation of the key ideas in contemporary mathematics. Three or four topics will be studied in-depth, with at least three chosen from the following list: geometry, combinatorics and probability, graph theory, logic and set theory, mathematics of finance, and statistics. These topics are taught with an emphasis on problem-solving. This course serves as a general mathematics elective for liberal arts majors.

Prerequisite: MAT 081 with a grade of C or higher or two years of high school algebra with grades of C or higher, or appropriate placement score.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 904

3 lec/week

MAT 121 - College Algebra

This course assumes proficiency with material in MAT 081. Topics extended to the college level include: real numbers, exponents and radicals, polynomials and factoring, fractional expressions, equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, conic sections, and systems of equations and inequalities. New topics include: zeros of polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, sequences, and the Binomial Theorem. This course requires a graphing calculator.

Prerequisite: Either High School ELA Math Level 3 with grades of C or higher, or both a geometry prerequisite (either MAT 076 with grade of C or higher or one year of high school geometry with grades of C or higher) and an algebra prerequisite (either MAT 081 with a grade of C or higher or two years of high school algebra with grades of C or higher or appropriate placement score).

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

MAT 122 - Trigonometry

This course consists of an elementary survey of trigonometry and its applications. Topics include a review of prerequisite topics, radian measure and the unit circle, trigonometric functions and their graphs, and inverse trigonometric functions. Also included are trigonometric identities and equations, the solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, and a review of exponential and logarithmic functions and their applications.

Prerequisite: MAT 121 with a grade of a "C" or higher OR four years of college preparatory high school mathematics with grades of a "C" or higher OR Math 3 with a grade of "C" or higher OR appropriate placement score.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MAT 150 - Computer Programming for Math and Engineering

The syntax of a high-level programming language is studied and applied to problems in mathematics, science and engineering. An emphasis is placed on the structured development of algorithms to solve these problems. The programming language features that lend themselves to problems in these areas such as special variable types, library and user defined functions, and subprograms are dealt with in more detail. Applications involving methods of finding roots of functions, numerical techniques of integration and differentiation, vector and matrix operations included.

Prerequisite: MAT 203 with a grade of C or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MAT 203 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

The elementary concepts of differential and integral calculus are introduced and applications are discussed. These include: limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, the indefinite and definite integral. Trigonometric functions are dealt with. Some applications are: related rates, graphing, extreme value problems and Newton's method for finding roots of equations.

Prerequisite: MAT 122 - Trigonometry with a grade of C or higher (or appropriate placement score) OR four years of college preparatory high school mathematics with grades of C or higher and either the appropriate placement score or an ACT Math score at least 26 OR Math 3 with a grade of C or higher and either appropriate placement score or an ACT Math score of at least 26

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

4 lec/week

MAT 204 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II

The methods of differentiation and integration are extended and power series are introduced. The new methods deal with: logarithms, exponential, hyperbolic and inverse trigonometric functions. Some applications are: area between two curves, volumes of revolution, arc length, and work. The techniques of integration by parts, partial fractions, trigonometric substitution and numerical integration are covered. Power series and the Taylor series function representation are introduced.

Prerequisite: MAT 203 with a grade of C or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 900-2, MTH 902

4 lec/week

MAT 205 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry III

The elementary ideas concerning conic sections, polar curves, and vector-valued and multivariate functions are covered. These topics include: area, arc length and tangents for polar curves. In addition, vectors, vector derivatives, curvature and motion in two and three space are studied. The multivariate concepts of differentiability, partial differentiation, gradient vectors, LaGrange multipliers, finding relative extreme values, and multiple integration are studied. This course also includes material on vector fields, line integrals, independence of path, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes Theorem.

Prerequisite: MAT 204 with a grade of C or higher.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 900-3, MTH 903

4 lec/week

MAT 211 - Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to methods of solving differential equations as well as applications of differential equations to physical problems. The methods for solving first-order differential equations include numerical techniques, separation of variables, substitution methods, exact equation techniques, and identification of integrating factors. Also, some types of higher order equations will be explored. Linear independence and the Wronskian of higher order equations will be covered. Methods for solving second-order homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations include the method of undetermined coefficients, reduction of order, and variation of parameters. LaPlace transforms and power series methods will also be studied, as well as some applications of second order equations.

Prerequisite: MAT 204 with a grade of C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: MTH 912

3 lec/week

MAT 220 - Finite Mathematics

A study of some major topics in finite mathematics: interest, annuities, matrix theory, matrix operations, solutions of systems of inequalities, linear programming by graphing and Simplex methods, principles of counting and probability. Applications of these topics in the fields of business management, economics, and social science, as well as natural science are included.

Prerequisite: MAT 121 with a grade of "C" or higher (or appropriate placement score), OR four years of college preparatory high school mathematics with grades of "C" or higher OR Math 3 with a grade of "C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 906

3 lec/week

MAT 221 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences

A brief course in elementary differential and integral calculus. Primarily for students of business, economics and social science, with emphasis on applications.

Prerequisite: MAT 121 with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement score, or four years of college preparatory high school mathematics with grades of C or higher OR Math 3 with a grade of "C" or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 900-B

3 lec/week

MAT 230 - Discrete Mathematics

An introduction to analysis of finite collections and mathematical foundations of sequential machines, computer system design, data structures and algorithms. Includes: sets and logic, counting, recursion, graph theory, trees, nets, Boolean algebra, automata, and formal grammars and languages.

Prerequisite: MAT121 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 905, CS 915

3 lec/week

MAT 231 - Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the mathematical theory and application of matrices, vectors, vector spaces, and linear transformations. Topics include the algebra of matrices for solving systems of linear equations, the theory of finite-dimensional vector spaces, and theorems and applications associated with eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Students will construct proofs of propositions involving the following: matrices, determinants, vector spaces and inner product spaces. Applications of linear algebra will be examined.

Prerequisite: MAT 204 with a grade of C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: MTH 911

3 lec/week

MAT 240 - Elementary Statistics

An introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, probability, theoretical and empirical distribution, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation.

Prerequisite: MAT 081 with a grade of "C" or higher or appropriate placement scores.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: M1 902

3 lec/week

MET 201 - Technical Physics

An examination of the basic principles of mechanics, sound, waves, materials properties, electricity, magnetism and dc and ac circuits and their applications in everyday life.

Prerequisite: MAT 080 or MAT 106 or permission of instructor.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

MET 212 - Strength of Materials

An introduction to the strength of materials methods of determining the internal stresses and deflections of basic load carrying members. The laboratory period is designed to supplement the classroom presentation and give the student a clearer understanding of the response of components and structures to external loads.

Prerequisite: MAT 106 and PHY 175

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

MET 220 - Topics/Issues in Precision Production

Application of precision production principles to specific problems through case studies, simulation, special projects or problem- solving procedures. No topic/issue can be offered more than twice in three years. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

MET 230 - Metallurgy and Heat Treatment

An introduction to concepts and principles of physical metallurgy and applications of these principles to the heat treatment of metals.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

MET 242 - Machine Design

This course is designed to follow MET 212 - Strength of Materials. The course considers the design principles of machine elements such as bearings, shafts, brakes, couplings, etc., through the use of graphical analysis and non-calculus based calculations in order to determine their size and shape. Machine elements are evaluated on the basis of applied forces, environmental factors and material properties.

Prerequisite: MET 212 with a grade of C or higher.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

MUS 101 - Fundamentals of Music

Fundamentals of music for those with little or no musical background. Includes study of notational symbols, scales, keys, intervals and rhythm. This course is highly recommended as preparation for MUS 111-Theory of Music, and for students with minimal background in music theory. This course is highly recommended as preparation for MUS 111 (Theory of Music I) and for students with minimal background in music theory.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

MUS 106 - Concert Choir

Practical experience in choral singing of accompanied and unaccompanied music of the various periods and styles.

1 Semester hour(s)

3 lab/week

MUS 111 - Theory of Music I

Begins an intense study of harmonic musical structure of the Common Practice period. Subject matter ranges from basic fundamentals to elementary formal structure, melodic analysis and writing in the musical practice of the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 181

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MUS 112 - Theory of Music II

A continuation of MUS 111. Study of diatonic harmony and non-harmonic tones. Introduction to chromatic harmony and secondary functions; small forms. Emphasis on part-writing analysis.

Prerequisite: MUS 111 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 182

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MUS 126 - Introduction to Audio for Multimedia**

Introduction to Audio for Multimedia provides an overview of the basic theory and practice of computer-based audio recording, editing, mastering, and distribution as it relates to applications in multimedia production, the World Wide Web, and commercial music.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

MUS 128 - Digital Audio Workstation**

This course develops and expands the competencies and skill sets that are acquired in MUS 126 Introduction to Audio for Multimedia. In addition to the continued emphasis on Pro Tools software, this course introduces studio setup, configuration, and system maintenance. This course introduces advanced platform-independent concepts and techniques in the recording arts. Music notation software is introduced in this class.

Prerequisite: MUS 126 or concurrent enrollment.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

MUS 131-133-135-137 - Applied Music

Stresses performance with proficiency requirements at each level. Instruction to be received by appointment. Placement and grade by audition and examination. Performance in juries and recitals are required each semester and constitute part of the grade. Instruction is granted in areas by the regular College staff and part-time instructors approved by the music department. Student should accumulate two credits per semester for his/her major performance medium, totaling eight credit hours for two-year music program. For secondary performance medium, the student should accumulate a total of four credit hours for two-year music program.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 to 2 Semester hour(s)

2-4 lab/week

MUS 139 - Ensemble - Vocal

Study and performance of music works written for smaller instrumental and vocal ensembles. Two hours per week and other meetings as scheduled. Students enrolled for credit expected to present at least one public performance per semester. All music majors are required to participate in some ensemble activity each semester.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 140 - Ensemble - Instrumental

Study and performance of music works written for smaller instrumental and vocal ensembles. Two hours per week and other meetings as scheduled. Students enrolled for credit expected to present at least one public performance per semester. All music majors are required to participate in some ensemble activity each semester.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 150 - Music History and Literature

A survey of the development of western music from the Middle Ages to the present. Representative works by major composers of each period are chosen to illustrate form, style and techniques in vocal and instrumental music. Recommended for music majors.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F1 901

3 lec/week

MUS 155 - Concert Band

Preparation and performance of a variety of instrumental concert band music. Students may enroll for one semester hour at a time for a total of two hours for each section. This course provides the needed group practice to complement individual music instruction and the music theory courses.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 160 - Pep Band**

Preparation and performance of band music at College sports events. Students may enroll for one semester hour at a time for a total of two hours, but may volunteer as a club member beyond the two semester hours. This course provides the needed group practice to complement individual music instruction and the music theory courses.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 171 - Keyboard Skills I

Develops a rudimentary knowledge of the keyboard and playing skills sufficient to cope with simple situations. Emphasis on notation, harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and basic piano literature.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 172 - Keyboard Skills II

The student will continue to develop keyboard and playing skills learned in MUS 171. Continued emphasis on notation, harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and basic piano literature.

Prerequisite: MUS 171 with a grade of C or better or proficiency examination.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 173 - Keyboard Skills III

The student will continue to develop keyboard and playing skills learned in MUS 172. Continued emphasis on notation, harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and basic piano literature.

Prerequisite: MUS 172 with a grade of C or better or proficiency examination.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 174 - Keyboard Skills IV

The student will continue to develop keyboard and playing skills learned in MUS 173-Keyboard Skills III. Continued emphasis on notation, harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and basic piano literature.

Prerequisite: MUS 173 with a grade of C or better or proficiency examination.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 181 - Aural Skills I

Develop skills in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation and sight-singing.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 111.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 182 - Aural Skills II

The student will continue to develop skills in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation and sight-singing learned in MUS 181.

Prerequisite: MUS 181 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 112.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 201 - Music Appreciation

A course where the novice can learn, without going into too much music history, the basic mechanics of all types of music ranging from classical to rock. The course emphasizes what to listen for and to identify factors that influence music (politics, religion, technology, philosophy, etc.). Examples of various arts are used to clarify fundamental concepts for those who have no experience in the field of music. (Open to all students)

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F1 900

3 lec/week

MUS 211 - Theory of Music III

A continuation of MUS 112. MUS 211 continues the study of modulation, chromatic harmony including altered, borrowed and extended tertian chordal structure. In addition, the student will expand their study of musical form; application of part-writing procedures to instrumental music.

Prerequisite: MUS 112 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 283.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MUS 212 - Theory of Music IV

A continuation of MUS 211. MUS 212 advances the student's study of chromatic harmony, including chromatic modulation, chords of the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth, mediants, and modernist techniques in the music of the late 18th through late 20th century.

Prerequisite: MUS 211 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 284.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

MUS 224 - Practicum II**

This is a capstone course for the Audio Technology II certificate. Each student will participate in a group that will develop a final project which utilizes concepts and skills mastered in the certificate courses. Projects will include, but not be limited to, a deliverable CD/DAT, video, website, etc., that demonstrates mastery of digital audio, recording techniques, and sound reinforcement techniques.

Prerequisite: BUS 211 or BUS 213, MUS 111, 112, 139, 140, 181, 182, 228 or concurrent enrollment.

3 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 5 lab/week

MUS 283 - Aural Skills III

The student will continue to develop skills in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation and sight-singing learned in MUS 182.

Prerequisite: MUS 182 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 211.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

MUS 284 - Aural Skills IV

The student will continue to develop skills in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation and sight-singing learned in MUS 283.

Prerequisite: MUS 283 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 212.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

NRS 101 - Basic Nursing Assistant

An introduction of theory and practice necessary to meet the patient's needs within the scope of the beginning nursing assistant. Topics will include basic information about body structure and function and related terminology, growth and development with emphasis on aging and the role and responsibilities of the nursing assistant to help the client with personal hygiene and mobility within a safe environment. The course includes clinical experience in a subacute health care setting. The student will provide care to individuals who need assistance with the activities of daily living.

Prerequisiste: Meet admission criteria of at least 15 years of age and ability to meet helath and immunization requirements that are detailed at the orientation session.

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

NRS 102 - Medical Terminology and Related Body Structure

This course is an introduction and overview of medical terminology. The emphasis is on the formation, meaning and use of common medical terms related to body structures, functions, and diseases.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

NRS 103 - Advanced Nursing Assistant

This course will focus on advanced nursing assistant skills. Topics will include the role and responsibilities of the nursing assistant in relation to measuring vital signs, assisting the patient with nutrition, fluid balance and elimination; special procedures, such as the application of heat and cold therapies, admission, discharge and postmortem care. Students will care for patients with common medical surgical conditions, Alzheimers Disease and related dementias. This course includes clinical experience in a subacute health care setting.

Prerequisite: NRS 101

4 Semester hour(s)

3 lec, 2 lab/week

NRS 108 - Practical Nursing Fundamentals

This course is designed to introduce the beginning practical nursing student to the profession of nursing with particular focus in the long term care setting. Safe and effective care principles will be applied. The students will be expected to manage hygiene related needs, basic safety, and nutritional provision of oral fluids and foods. Concepts related to assessment, culture, values and ethics, legal aspects, and therapeutic interpersonal communication skills will be presented. The principles and practices of medication administration will be introduced. Alterations in bowel and urinary elimination, oxygenation, rest and sleep will be discussed. The concepts of pain, teaching and learning, death and dying, and spirituality will be addressed. The nursing process will be introduced and integrated throughout the course. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to perform competent nursing care will be applied to the care of the geriatric/adult patients. Clinical experience will focus on the basic care of the geriatric/adult resident in the long term care setting.

Prerequisite: Admission to the LPN program.

13 Semester hour(s)

8 lec/5 lab

NRS 109 - Foundations of Modern Bedside Nursing II and Reproductive Health

This course includes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of nursing care related to the following: maternity patient, normal newborn and newborn with complications, pediatric patient, care of patients with sexually transmitted diseases, and pathology and care related to the urinary and reproductive systems (male and female). The clinical/laboratory component will help reinforce knowledge and skills needed with the birthing family, hospitalized child, well child care, and adult patients with selected medical and surgical conditions with a patient-centered focus.

Prerequisite: NRS 108 with a grade of C or better.

7 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/6 lab

NRS 110 - Practical Nursing-Foundations of Medical Surgical Nursing I

Topics will include the knowledge, skills and attitudes of nursing care related to gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, diabetes, respiratory, and cardiovascular and hematologic and lymphatic system disorders. The clinical and laboratory component provides experience in the care of the patient throughout the adult lifespan (ages 18 years through old age) with medical and surgical conditions with integration of the nursing process.

Prerequisites: NRS 108 and BIO 108 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.

7 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/6 lab

NRS 111 - Practical Nursing-Foundations of Medical Surgical Nursing III

Topics will include the systems and concepts of nursing care related to actual mental health diagnoses or issues and disease states in the systems of endocrine, immune, nervous and integumentary. Evidence based knowledge, skills, and attitudes of practical nursing regarding education, teamwork, and employment opportunities; preparation for licensure; career evaluation; legal responsibilities, and the concept and management of patient centered care are incorporated. The clinical component will provide experience in the adult long term and skilled care nursing settings.

Prerequisites: NRS 109 and NRS 110 with a grade of C or better.

5.5 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/3 lab/week

NRS 113 - Drug Dosage Calculations

A course designed to promote competency in calculating commonly encountered drug dosage problems. Conversions between metric and household systems will be covered. Concepts regarding safety in medication administration and interpreting health care provider orders will be included. Students will learn how to calculate oral, parenteral, IV flow rates, titration and pediatric drug dosage calculations using their calculation method of choice.

Prerequisite:

  • BIO 108 or concurrent enrollment in BIO 108; AND
  • NRS 108 or concurrent enrollment in NRS 108; OR
  • Permission of instructor

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

NRS 115 - Intravenous Therapy

The purpose of the Intravenous Therapy Course is to provide the appropriate knowledge, skill, and attitudes to perform selected tasks identified in the Illinois Nurse Practice Act related to intravenous therapy on stabilized patients under the supervision of a registered nurse, physician, dentist or podiatrist.

NRS 108 with a grade of "C" or better or current Illinois practical nurse license and/or a sponsoring agency willing to provide a registered nurse preceptor and consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

1.5 lec/0.5 lab/week

NRS 116 - Medical Terminology for Health Careers

NRS 116 is an internet-based medical terminology course designed for students pursuing health careers. Students will develop knowledge of the foundation of word parts, combining forms, anatomical terminology, and medical terms organized by body systems. The course includes the study of definition and use of medical terms common to many health related disciplines.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

NRS 121 - CNA Recertification

This course is designed for students interested in working in nursing homes or hospital settings, and who must validate 21 performance skills due to a consecutive 24 month lapse in CNA employment. Through this eight hour program, students will be reevaluated in a clinical setting providing care to individuals who need assistance with activities of daily living.

Prerequisite: Must be on the Illinois Healthcare Worker Registry iin good standing.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

1 lab

NRS 132 - Nutrition and Diet Therapy

This course is designed to provide knowledge about the basic principles of nutrition, nutrition in health promotion and nutrition in health care. The topics of this course include essential nutrients, their sources, absorption, metabolisms and functions, food safety, nutrition across the life span, and an introduction to clinical nutrition. Credit will not be awarded for both NRS 132 and PED 115.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

NRS 140 - Fundamentals of Nursing Practice

This course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the profession of nursing in the long term care and acute care settings. Safe and effective care will be emphasized. Students will be expected to manage hygiene related needs, safety, and nutritional provision of oral fluids and foods. Concepts related to assessment, culture, values, ethics, legal aspects, and therapeutic interpersonal communication skills will be presented. The principles and practices of medication administration and safe maintenance of an IV infusion will be introduced. Alterations in bowel and urinary elimination, oxygenation, rest and sleep will be discussed. The concepts necessary to support a patient's psychosocial integrity including pain, teaching and learning, death and dying, and spirituality will be addressed. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to perform basic nursing skills competently will be applied to the care of the aged and adult patients with medical/surgical conditions in the classroom, lab and clinical setting. The nursing process will be introduced and integrated throughout the course.

Admission to ADN program. BIO 109 with a grad of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment.

9 Semester hour(s)

5 lec/8 lab

NRS 141 - Pharmacology for Nursing

This course is designed to provide nursing students an introduction to the principles of pharmacology with emphasis on drug classes, rationale for use, dosage, therapeutic, adverse and side effects, integration of legal, ethical, other social factors and nursing implications.

Admission to the ADN or LPN program. Bio 108 or 109 with a grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec.

NRS 142 - Medical Surgical Nursing I

The fundamental principles previously learned are applied to the management of the perioperative patient, management of patients with problems of the endocrine, nervous, skin, and immune systems. Other concepts include intravenous therapy, fluid & electrolytes, shock, community health nursing, emergency are, bioterrorism, and the concepts of management for safe and effective care. The lab and clinical component provides experience in meeting the needs of the aged patient and adult patient with medical and surgical problems.

NRS 140 Fundamentals of Nursing Practice, NRS 141 Pharmacology for Nursing with a grade of "C" or better, BIO 110 with a grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment.

9 Semester hour(s)

5 lec/8 lab

NRS 200 - Nursing Concepts for Role Transition

Nursing concepts designed to aid the student in role transition necessary for upward mobility. Emphasis on the utilization of the components of the nursing process; concepts related to nursing in less predictable, possibly unstable environments. Includes introduction to the registered professional nurses role in patient teaching activities. For students taking the lab component, activities will consist of orientation to the Nursing Skills Lab and the Clinical Competency Exam procedure. In addition, the student will receive an assessment of their skill level in relation to generic students at the end of the second semester of the ADN program.

Prerequisite: Licensed practical nurse or eligible for licensure. LPNs who graduated from SVCC after July 1991 may be exempt from the lab section.

1 to 2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 0-2 lab/week

NRS 201 - Bridging Nursing Concepts

This course is designed to provide review of basic nursing concepts for the LPN to transition to the professional nurse role. The nursing process and key concept related to nursing care in the acute care environment will be covered. Lab activities will prepare the student for the skills required for NRS 243-Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing.

Licensed Practical Nurse or eligible for licensure. Lab section is a review of required skills.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/2 lab

NRS 230 - Medical-Surgical Nursing II

Study of selected health problems. Focus on patients with problems of a cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, respiratory, and endocrine nature. The physical examination will be explored in relation to assessment. In the clinical component, the nursing process will be applied to the care and support of selected patients with a variety of medical-surgical conditions.

Prerequisite: NRS 133 and BIO 110 and BIO 111 with a grade of C or better.

5 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 6 lab/week

NRS 232 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

The course focuses on the concepts related to the development of mental illness. Emphasis is placed on nursing interventions which are essential to the care of people with mental health problems, such as therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. The clinical component provides experience in utilizing the nursing process to meet the needs of patients with varying degrees of deviant behavior in the acute, chronic and outpatient setting.

Prerequisite: NRS 133 and BIO 110 and BIO 111 with a grade of C or better.

4 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 4 lab/week

NRS 234 - Nursing of Children

Nursing discussions focus on the most common acute and long term health problems of the child. Effects of illness and hospitalization on the child and family unit will also be explored. The course includes a practicum component with experience in the acute care and well child setting. The use of normal growth and development criteria are stressed.

Prerequisite: NRS 133 and BIO 110 and BIO 111 and PSY 200 with a grade of C or better.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

NRS 235 - Medical-Surgical Nursing III

Continuation of the study of selected adult health problems. Focus on patients with burns and disorders of the eye and ear. In addition, disorders of renal, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems will be examined. In the clinical component, the nursing process will be applied to the care and support of selected patients with a variety of medical-surgical conditions.

Prerequisite: NRS 230 with a grade of C or better.

5 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 6 lab/week

NRS 237 - Maternity Nursing

A professional maternity and female reproductive nursing course which studies past, present and future issues and trends of maternity nursing. Nursing discussions focus on the normal physiological changes and maternal adaptations related to pregnancy and nursing care of the normal prenatal, intrapartal and postpartal client and the normal neonate. Common complications of pregnancy, labor and delivery, postpartum, and the neonate are also discussed. The clinical component will provide selected experiences in the care of prenatal, intrapartal, postpartal clients, and the newborn. This course also focuses on the client with common diseases of the female reproductive system.

Prerequisite: NRS 133 and BIO 110 and BIO 111 with a grade of C or better.

4 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 4 lab/week

NRS 239 - Trends in Nursing

This course focuses on topic areas pertinent to the new graduate. Content includes principles of leadership and management, socio-economic conditions affecting nursing practice and education; nursing organizations, and employment opportunities for nurses. The legal and professional responsibilities of the graduate nurse are also discussed.

Prerequisite: NRS 133 and BIO 110 and BIO 111 with a grade of C or better.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

NRS 243 - Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing

Requires students to apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes for or towards the care of adult patients in a simulated laboratory and acute care environments. Complex multisystem disruptions and the subsequent nursing needs for patient care will be experienced. Focus will be on patients with related cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, hematologic, renal, shock and acid/base imbalances. Students will apply the nursing process and utilize information literacy skills to achieve deliberative and competent decision-making that is grounded in evidence based practice to achieve best practice outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on prioritization of care through collaboration with other members of the health care team, patients and their families.

NRS 142 Medical Surgical Nursing I. BIO 110 with a grade of "C" or better.

8 Semester hour(s)

4 lec./8 lab

NRS 244 - Pediatric Nursing

This course explores the physiological alterations of clients with acute and chronic health care needs. Building on the foundations of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, students will examine the impact of and plan nursing care for pediatric clients experiencing acute and/or chronic alterations. Utilizing the nursing process and nursing management, psychosocial and physiological adaptations will be examined in the context of social justice, cultural competence, and equity of health care.

Enrollment in the Nursing Program and NRS 142-Medical Surgical Nursing I with a grade of "C" or better.

2.5 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/1 lab

NRS 245 - Reproductive Health

This course introduces and examines past, present and future trends involving male and female reproductive health (from puberty through menopause). Nursing discussions will emphasize and expand student knowledge regarding pregnancy, labor and delivery, postpartum and newborn (antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and newborn care) for normal and complicated care situations. Lifestyle choices and the effects on an individual's health will be discussed as well as family dynamics, abuse, and reproductive illnesses (diseases/issues). The clinical component will help reinforce knowledge and skills needed in maternal and infant areas concerning assessments, planning, decision making abilities, and critical thinking.

PSY 103, NRS 142 and BIO 110 all with a "C" or better.

3.5 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/3 lab

NRS 246 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

The course focuses on the concepts related to nurse management of patients with mental illness. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes, such as therapeutic nurse-patient relationship, which are essential to the care of persons with mental health problems. The lab and clinical component provides experience in utilizing the nursing process to meet the needs of patients with varying degrees of illness behavior in the acute, chronic and outpatient settings.

NRS 243-Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing and PSY 103 both with a grade of "C" or better.

4 Semester hour(s)

2.5 lec/3 lab

NRS 247 - Transition into Practice Capstone

A clinical-based learning experience that enables the student to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to implement advanced nursing theory, skills, and research in the delivery of nursing care to the complex patient. Data sets of health care systems will be analyzed for comparison with current national, state and local trends and standards. An evidence based project to enhance patient care will be created. The project will incorporate the principles of communication, teamwork, patient centered care, quality improvement and informatics to advocate for the highest standard of nursing practice. Review of previous systems and concepts will be done for NCLEX preparation.

NRS 243-Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing with a grade of "C" or better.

6 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/6 lab

NUR 178 - Pharmacology

Pharmacology focuses on reinforcing the relationship between pharmacologic knowledge and nursing practice. It provides the background needed to understand drugs currently on the market, as well as drugs yet to be released. Nursing implications using the nursing process are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Admission to online nursing program

Co-requisite: NUR 179, NUR 181

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

NUR 179 - Fundamentals of Nursing

Fundamentals of Nursing is a foundation course in the nursing process which introduces the Neuman Systems Model with its emphasis on holistic health of culturally diverse clients. The Systems Model provides an integrated understanding of the client, the environment, health and nursing. Basic skills necessary for implementation of the nursing process will be included.

Prerequisite: Admission to online nursing program

Co-requisite: NUR 178, NUR 181

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

NUR 181 - Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical

Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical introduces application of the nursing process and the Neuman Systems Model in various settings including long-term care and acute care facilities. Successful mastery of skills in an intensive laboratory setting will be accomplished prior to clinical experience.

Prerequisite: Admission to online nursing program

Co-requisite: NUR 178, NUR 179

5.5 Semester hour(s)

11 lab/week

NUR 182 - Medical/Surgical Nursing I

Medical/Surgical Nursing I builds on previous content, with an emphasis on applying the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/or surgical conditions. Topics include health promotion and illness, biopsychosocial concepts related to health care, clients with fluid, electrolyte, and acid-based imbalances, critical thinking, perioperative, immune system and oxygenation.

Prerequisite: NUR 178, NUR 179, NUR 181

Co-requisite: NUR 183

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

NUR 183 - Medical/Surgical Nursing I Clinical

Medical/Surgical Nursing I Clinical applies the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/or surgical conditions. Emphasis is on fluid, electrolyte, and acid-based imbalances, perioperative nursing, immune system disorders and oxygenation.

Prerequisite: NUR 178, NUR 179, NUR 181

Co-requisite: NUR 182

5.5 Semester hour(s)

11 lab/week

NUR 280 - Family Health Nursing

Family Health Nursing introduces application of the nursing process to assist all family members to reach optimal levels of wellness. Content ranges from prenatal care through childbirth to care of the child through adolescence. Alternations in health are included.

Prerequisite: NUR 178, NUR 179, NUR 181, NUR 182, NUR 183

Co-requisite: NUR 281

5 Semester hour(s)

5 lec/week

NUR 281 - Family Health Nursing Clinical

Family Health Nursing Clinical introduces application of the nursing process with families both in wellness and alterations in health. Select clinical experiences will be arranged which may include clinics and acute care settings.

Prerequisite: NUR 178, NUR 179, NUR 181, NUR 182, NUR 183

Co-requisite: NUR 280

3 Semester hour(s)

12 lab/week

NUR 282 - Medical/Surgical Nursing II

Medical/Surgical Nursing II builds on previous content, with an emphasis on applying the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/or surgical conditions. Topics include assessment and interventions for clients with cardiac, hematologic, nervous, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal problems.

Prerequisite: NUR 182, NUR 183

Co-requisite: NUR 283

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

NUR 283 - Medical/Surgical Nursing II Clinical

Medical/Surgical Nursing II Clinical builds on previous content, with an emphasis on applying the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/or surgical conditions. Topics include assessment and interventions for clients with cardiac, hematologic, nervous, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal problems.

Prerequisite: NUR 182, NUR 183

Co-requisite: NUR 282

3 Semester hour(s)

12 lab/week

NUR 284 - Professional Roles in Nursing

Professional Roles in Nursing covers many topics, including the history of nursing, development of the profession, ethical and bioethical issues, nursing law and liability, role of the registered nurse, leadership and management, diversity in current practice, and alternative and complementary healing practice.

Prerequisite: NUR 280, NUR 281, NUR 282, NUR 283

Co-requisite: NUR 285, NUR 286, NUR 287, NUR 288

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

NUR 285 - Mental Health Nursing

Mental Health Nursing uses the nursing process to assess clients and families with physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual stressors which impact clients defenses, disturbing their stability. Nursing interventions to assist clients to achieve a state of wellness are emphasized. Community resources for aiding mental health and treating mental illness will be identified.

Prerequisite: NUR 280, NUR 281, NUR 282, NUR 283

Co-requisite: NUR 284, NUR 286

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

NUR 286 - Mental Health Nursing Clinical

Mental Health Nursing Clinical applies the nursing process using primary, secondary and tertiary prevention/interventions in community, acute care and mental health settings.

Prerequisite: NUR 280, NUR 281, NUR 282, NUR 283

Co-requisite: NUR 284, NUR 285

3 Semester hour(s)

12 lab/week

NUR 287 - Medical/Surgical Nursing III

Medical/Surgical Nursing III builds on previous content, with an emphasis on applying the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/ or surgical conditions. Topics include assessment and interventions for clients with emergency, sensory, endocrine, integumentary and renal conditions.

Prerequisite: NUR 280, NUR 281, NUR 282, NUR 283

Co-requisite: NUR 284, NUR 288

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

NUR 288 - Medical Surgical III Clinical

Medical/Surgical Nursing III builds on previous content, with an emphasis on applying the nursing process to multicultural clients with medical and/or surgical conditions. Topics include assessment and interventions for clients with emergency, sensory, endocrine, integumentary and renal conditions.

Prerequisite: NUR 280, NUR 281, NUR 282, NUR 283

Co-requisite: NUR 284, NUR 287

3 Semester hour(s)

12 lab/week

OAS 103 - Keyboarding and Document Processing Basic - Level I

Instruction in keyboard and machine control techniques with the objective of developing a mastery of the keyboard and skills in producing basic and academic reports.

2 Semester hour(s)

4 lab/week

OAS 104 - Keyboarding and Document Processing Basic - Level II

Instruction in keyboard and machine control techniques with the objective of developing a mastery of the keyboard and skills in producing basic and academic reports.

Prerequisite: OAS 103

2 Semester hour(s)

4 lab/week

OAS 105 - Document Processing Intermediate - Level I

Designed for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge and skill for vacational use of the microcomputer for document production. Emphasis is placed on intensive skill building in the areas of speed and accuracy. Skill is developed in letter-style variations. Creation of documents from rough draft copy, business source-paper forms, manuscript, and statistical tabulation problems are included. Composition at the keyboard is also introduced.

Prerequisites: OAS 104.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 106 - Document Processing Intermediate - Level II

Designed for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge and skill for vocational use of the microcomputer for document production. Emphasis is placed on intensive skill building in the areas of speed and accuracy. Skill is developed in letter-style variations. Creation of documents from rough draft copy, business source-paper forms, manuscript, statistical tabulation, and international formatting problems are included.

Prerequisites: OAS 105.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 107 - Document Processing Intermediate - Level III

Designed for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge and skill for office use of the microcomputer for document production. Emphasis is placed on intensive skill building in the areas of speed and accuracy. Skill is developed in letter-style variations. Creation of documents from rough draft copy, business source-paper forms, manuscript, composition, and statistical tabulation problems are included.

Prerequisites: OAS 106.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 108 - Document Processing Intermediate - Level IV

Designed for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge and skill for office use of the microcomputer for document production. Emphasis is placed on intensive skill building in the areas of speed and accuracy. Skill is developed in letter-style variations. Creation of documents from rough draft copy, business source-paper forms, manuscript, composition, statistical tabulation, and web creation problems are included.

Prerequisites: OAS 107 or equivalent.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 110 - Proofreading and Editing

Designed for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge in proofreading and editing skills including a review of the rules in language arts. It is designed to sharpen skills in detecting and correcting errors in written communications and provides a thorough review in proofreading, editing, and formatting.

Prerequisites: OAS 104.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 111 (1) - Machine Transcription

Designed to build secretarial skills through the use of office dictation equipment. Spelling, punctuation, grammar, proofreading, editing and composing are stressed using realistic job experiences. Letters and other materials must be transcribed at a speed that would be acceptable in an office situation.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 111 (2) - Machine Transcription

Designed to build secretarial skills through the use of office dictation equipment. Spelling, punctuation, grammar, proofreading, editing and composing are stressed using realistic job experiences. Letters and other materials must be transcribed at a speed that would be acceptable in an office situation.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

2 Semester hour(s)

4 lab/week

OAS 111 (3) - Machine Transcription

Designed to build secretarial skills through the use of office dictation equipment. Spelling, punctuation, grammar, proofreading, editing and composing are stressed using realistic job experiences. Letters and other materials must be transcribed at a speed that would be acceptable in an office situation.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

OAS 112 - Legal Transcription

An introductory course designed to enable office workers to effectively deal with legal terminology and forms. All assignments will be typed from dictation presented on a transcribing unit. Areas of study in the course include: 1) general law, 2) corporate law, 3) litigation, 4) real estate, and 5) wills and estates.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

OAS 113 - Medical Transcription

An introductory course designed to enable office workers to deal effectively with medical terminology and forms. All assignments will be typed from dictation presented on a transcribing unit.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

OAS 130 - Records Management

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the process of using Alphabetic, Correspondence, Geographic, Subject, and Numeric filing rules used based on or adapted from the latest recommendations of the Association of Records Managers and Administrators (ARMA) as well as hands-on practice simulation. In addition to providing the student with basic indexing and filing rules, the student will be exposed to the use of problem-solving techniques for situations in which filing solutions are appropriate using the ARMA filing rules. Students will also be exposed to filing documents electronically.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 141 - Word Processing with Microcomputers

This course will familiarize the user with advanced features of word processing. Course emphasis will include document creation, document deleting and document printing.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

2 Semester hour(s)

4 lab/week

OAS 202 - Document Processing Advanced - Level I

Instruction in the development of proficiency in production of office documents. Content includes production of technical and statistical reports, complex tabulations, basic integrated marketing and hospitality documents; and correspondence including block and modified block letters with various notations using the microcomputer with word processing software.

Prerequisite: OAS 108.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 203 - Document Processing Advanced - Level II

Instruction in the development of proficiency in production of office documents. Content includes production of correspondence, complex tabulation, basic legal documents; and advanced composition using the microcomputer with word processing software.

Prerequisite: OAS 202.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 204 - Document Processing Advanced - Level III

Instruction in the development of proficiency in production of office documents. Content includes production of technical and statistical reports, complex tabulations, basic legal documents; and advanced composition using the microcomputer with word processing software.

Prerequisite: OAS 203.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 205 - Document Processing Advanced - Level IV

Instruction in the development of proficiency in production of office documents. Content includes production of technical and statistical reports, complex tabulations, basic legal documents; and advanced composition using the microcomputer with word processing software.

Prerequisite: OAS 204.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 213 - Advanced Medical Transcription

An advanced course to enable office workers to work effectively with medical terminology and forms. All assignments will be typed from dictation presented on a transcribing unit. Medical specialties will be covered in this course.

Prerequisite: OAS 113.

3 Semester hour(s)

6 lab/week

OAS 233 - Calculating Machines - Level I

An introduction to the basic operating techniques of electronic calculators. Professional skill in machine operation will be developed through systematic practice.

Prerequisites: BUS 106.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 234 - Calculating Machines - Level II

An introduction to the basic operating techniques of electronic calculators. Professional skill in machine operation will be developed through systematic practice.

Prerequisites: OAS 233.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 235 - Calculating Machines - Level III

An introduction to the basic operating techniques of electronic calculators. Professional skill in machine operation will be developed through systematic practice.

Prerequisites: OAS 234.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

OAS 241 - Word Processing Concepts

Introduces principles of word processing. Emphasis is on office practices, organizational structure, role of the office worker and career opportunities.

Prerequisite: OAS 104 and CIS 109.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

OAS 251 - Office Methods

Methods, procedures and office routines employed in the various types of business offices. An examination of office ethics, the function and responsibility of the office employee, telephone usage and etiquette and receptionist techniques. The role of the office worker in data processing is discussed. Emphasis on the control of office systems which facilitate the creation, usage, storage, disposal and preservation of business records.

Prerequisite: OAS 104.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

OAS 270 - Case Studies/Problems in Office Systems

Application of office occupation principles to specific problems through case studies, simulation, special class projects or problem solving procedures. No topic/problem can be offered more than twice in three years. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Semester hour(s)

1-6 lec/week

PED 102 - Beginning Yoga

Introduction to the theory and practice of yoga as a form of exercise, relaxation and improved posture. It provides a foundation for sound physical health and conditioning for other sports and activities. Yoga is also recommended as a form of stress reduction.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 103 - Intermediate Yoga

This course is concerned with the continued development of skills introduced in PED 102 - Beginning Yoga. Review and refinement of beginning level Yoga exercises will be emphasized. Additional exercises will be added as students demonstrate proficiency.

Prerequisite: PED 102 or consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 106 - Adult Tumbling

Basic tumbling that focuses on safety and enjoyment for beginner to intermediate tumbling skills on the rod, floor, air trak, tumble trak, trampoline, and double-mini.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 115 - Nutrition and Diet Therapy

This course is designed to provide knowledge about the basic principles of nutrition, nutrition in health promotion and nutrition in health care. The topics of this course include essential nutrients, their sources, absorption, metabolisms and functions, nutrition across the life span and an introduction to clinical nutrition. Credit will not be awarded for both PED 115 and NRS 132.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PED 117 - Water Aerobics

Students will participate in a beginning level water fitness class. This class is designed to increase cardiovascular fitness along with muscle strength and flexibility. This is an excellent fitness alternative for arthritis and back injured persons. Most classes will consist of a warm-up and a cool-down period. Active participation is required.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 120 - Badminton

Instruction and demonstration of the fundamental skills such as grip, serve, strokes, rules and strategy. Intraclass tournament.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 121 - Basketball

Instruction and demonstration in fundamental skills such as passing, dribbling, shooting, team offense and defense, knowledge of rules and strategies, evaluation of rules and all skills which are taught. Intraclass tournament and competition.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 123 - Conditioning

Instruction in the testing and measuring of physical abilities and sports skills. Included are suggestions for relaxation, the effects of exercise and diet on the body, warm-up exercises and self-testing stunts. Special sections are offered from time to time for senior citizens.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 125 - All-Level Swimming

This course is designed for swimmers at all levels. Beginning swimmers will develop basic swimming and water safety/survival skills. Intermediate and advanced swimmers will receive safety and rescue instruction. All students will learn the recreational and fitness benefits of swimming.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 126 - Tennis

Introduction to the theory and practice of tennis. Instruction in the following skills: serve, strokes, footwork and rules of scoring. Outdoor activity when weather permits.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 127 - Volleyball

Introduction to such basic volleyball skills as serve, pass, set-up and attack. Team play stressed under competition provided in class.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 129 - Weightlifting

Instruction in the proper use of weights to develop strength and physical conditioning. Safety will receive considerable attention. Individual program will be set up for each student.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 134 - Beginning Golf

Course will cover general history of game, etiquette on the course and instruction to acquire skills necessary to beginners game of golf.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 148 - Team Sports

Combination of seasonal sports, touch football/volleyball (fall semester) and basketball/softball (spring semester). Instruction, demonstration and practice, fundamental skills, knowledge of rules and strategies of play will be covered. Interclass competition.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 150 - Super-Circuit Fitness I

Introduction to and participation in a multi-station aerobic super-circuit through the use of sub-maxial weights with multiple repetitions. After initial cardiovascular and other physiological training, students develop their strength, flexibility and cardiovascular endurance and reduce body fat by rotating through a circuit of twelve exercise machines, changing machines once every 30 seconds.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 151 - Super-Circuit Fitness II

A continuation of PED 150 - Super-Circuit Fitness I. The course is for those students desiring to continue benefiting from the Super-Circuit Fitness Center.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 152 - Super-Circuit Fitness III

A continuation of PED 151 - Super-Circuit Fitness II. The course is for those students desiring to continue benefiting from the Super-Circuit Fitness Center.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 153 - Super-Circuit Fitness IV

A continuation of PED 152 - Super-Circuit Fitness III. The course is for those students desiring to continue benefiting from the Super-Circuit Fitness Center.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 155 - Aerobics

Students will work on testing and measuring physical abilities. The effects of exercise and diet on the body, warm-up exercises, and conditioning will all be incorporated.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 210 - Techniques and Theory of Basketball Coaching

Instruction and demonstration of fundamental skills, study of the rules, theory of offense and defense, methods of organizing practices, the psychology of coaching and the development of team spirit. Classroom and practical participation.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PED 211 - Techniques and Theory of Baseball Coaching

Instruction and demonstration of fundamental skills, study of rules, theory of offense and defense, methods of organizing practices, the psychology of coaching and the development of team spirit. Classroom and practical participation.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PED 213 - First Aid

Action to be taken in case of accident and sudden illness in the home, school and community. Students successfully completing the course will receive standard American Red Cross Certification in one person CPR and First Aid.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

PED 214 - Introduction to Physical Education

Course covers the historical development, philosophies, aims and objectives of physical education. Students will be oriented as to the scope and opportunities of physical education teachers in modern school system.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PED 220 - Rhythms and Games for Children

Methods of administering, supervising and teaching the major areas of rhythms, games, testing and apparatus in the elementary school grades. The course is designed to fit the needs of the classroom teacher in approaching the area of learning.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

PED 234 - Intermediate Golf

This course is concerned with the continued development of skills introduced in PED 134 (Beginning Golf). Review of etiquette, in- depth analysis of rules, strategy, drills and practice are emphasized.

Prerequisite: PED 134 or consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

PED 260 - Sports Officiating

This course will prepare the participant to become an official for IHSA wrestling. The student will learn objectives, skills, and techniques for wrestling officiating. Preparation for the Illinois High School Association certification test includes supervised practical experience.

1 Semester hour(s)

.5 lec, 1 lab/week

PHL 101 - Introduction to Logic and Formal Reasoning

A study of the principles of correct reasoning. Attention will be given to such topics as the logical use of language, types of definition, mathematical logic and the methods of science. Emphasis is placed on understanding logical theory and on using techniques of valid reasoning.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H4 906

3 lec/week

PHL 102 - Introduction to Philosophy

By listening to lectures and studying the text, students will be exposed to and engaged in a broad and intensive study of philosophy. Although the emphasis will be on western thought, they will be exposed to alternative views and the basics of non-western philosophy. Students will become familiar with and come to understand the essential features of philosophic thought. They will learn to define philosophy and to understand metaphysics, epistemology, and questions of God.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H4 900

3 lec/week

PHL 103 - Ethics and Social Policy

An examination of moral aspects of human conduct and a study of ethical principles for moral evaluation. Surveys ethical theory from antiquity to the present.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H4 904

3 lec/week

PHL 104 - World Religions

A comparative survey of some of the leading ideas of the worlds major religions, including Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Attention will be given also to the primitive roots of civilized religion and to the cultural context in which the various conceptions developed.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: H5 904N

3 lec/week

PHL 204 - Contemporary Moral Issues

This course presents each side of several controversial social issues such as abortion and affirmative action. The main thrust of the course is to see the ethical basis of these issues in light of some traditional and liberal philosophical thought.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PHY 175 - Introduction to Physics

Basic concepts of physics including units in mechanics, sound, optics, electricity, magnetism and Bohr theory; to build an organized body of knowledge relating to physical phenomena encountered in the student's life. Designed to meet the laboratory requirements for non-science majors and students in elementary education.

Prerequisite: ELT 120; or MAT 080, MAT 081, MAT 106, or higher; or 2 years of high school algebra with a grades of "C" or higher; or appropriate mathematics placement score.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 900L

3 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 201 - General Physics I

This course is a survey of the general principles of mechanics, sound and heat. The course is designed for: (1) those students whose curriculum requires a one-year course in physics (pre-medical, pre-dental, architecture, agriculture, radio communication); (2) engineering students who have not had high school physics; (3) students who have an interest in the field of physics and select it to satisfy the science requirement of their curriculum. The main objective of the course is to acquaint the student with the experimental method, to develop laboratory skills and to present the student with an organized body of knowledge related to physical phenomena encountered in the student's life.

Prerequisite: MAT 121.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P1 900L

4 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 202 - General Physics II

This course is a survey of the general principles of electricity, magnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. It provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and mathematics associated with physics as an organized body of knowledge based on the scientific method.

Prerequisite: PHY 201.

5 Semester hour(s)

4 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 210 - Introduction to Engineering Profession

This course is an introduction to the different engineering fields and careers. It examines the role of the engineer in society, professional engineering organizations, basic skills associated with engineering problem solving and communication, the engineering design process, and ethics and professional responsibility.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

PHY 211 - Engineering Physics I

An examination of the basic principles of mechanics with special emphasis on conceptual and mathematical problem-solving. Topics include linear kinematics, Newton's Laws, rotational motion, gravitation, and equilibrium.

Prerequisites: High school physics or PHY 201 and MAT 203.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: P2 900L

4 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 212 - Engineering Physics II

An examination of the basic principles of electricity and magnetism with selected topics in electric and magnetic fields, potentials, network theory, dielectric and magnetic properties of matter, capacitance, inductance, dc and ac circuits, Maxwells equations, and electromagnetic waves.

Prerequisite: PHY 211 and MAT 204 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 204.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: PHY 912

4 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 213 - Engineering Physics III

An introduction to heat and thermodynamics, oscillations and waves, geometrical and physical optics, the properties of light, relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, elementary particles, and solid state physics..

Prerequisite: PHY 212 and MAT 204.

5 Semester hour(s)

IAI: PHY 913

4 lec, 2 lab/week

PHY 221 - Mechanics I (Statics)

A vector algebra approach to understanding the principles of and problem-solving techniques of both particle and rigid body systems in three dimensions. Topics include rigid body equilibrium and equivalent systems of force, centroids, analysis of structures, and friction.

Prerequisite: PHY 211 and MAT 204 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 204.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: EGR 942

3 lec/week

PHY 222 - Mechanics II (Dynamics)

A course which begins with a study of particle motion and extends into rigid body motion. The kinematics of motion are explored and dynamic, kinetic, and impulse/momentum concepts are used to solve the equations of motion.

Prerequisites: PHY 221 and MAT 205 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 205.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: EGR 943

3 lec/week

PHY 246 - Introduction to Circuit Analysis

This course is an introduction to methods for analyzing electric circuits using the following elements and methods of analysis: Kirchoffs laws, node and mesh equations, equivalent circuits, operational amplifiers, resistor-capacitor-inductor circuits, sinusoidal steady-state analysis, three-phase circuits, Laplace transforms, transfer functions and frequency response.

Prerequisite: PHY 212 and MAT 211 or consent of instructor.

4 Semester hour(s)

IAI: EGR 931

4 lec/week

PHY 247 - Circuit Analysis Laboratory

This course presents students with a series of experimental projects that analyze different network configurations. It utilizes circuit analysis methods, such as Kirchoffs laws, nodal and mesh equations, resistor combination laws, the superposition theorem, Thevenins and Nortons theorems, and phasor analysis to characterize both DC and AC circuits.

Prerequisite: PHY 246 or concurrent enrollment and PHY 212 and MAT 211 or consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

IAI: EGR 931L

2 lab/week

PHY 270 - Topics and Issues in Physics

This course is offered in a seminar or workshop format over special topics or current issues in physics. The central theme of the course will be listed on the student's permanent academic record.

Prerequisites: Determined by topics presented.

1 to 5 Semester hour(s)

1-6 lec/lab week

PSC 163 - American Politics and Government

Students will examine American constitutional foundations and democratic values, explore the role of public opinion and the character of the political process, and understand the role of the media and interest groups in policy-making. Students will gain an understanding of how the major branches of the federal government work, and improve skills in evaluating and analyzing current public policy issues.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S5 900

3 lec/week

PSC 164 - State and Local Politics and Government

This course is a survey of the institutions, politics and public policies of government in American states and communities. Special emphasis will be given to the State of Illinois and the communities of the Sauk Valley area.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S5 902

3 lec/week

PSC 232 - Introduction to Comparative Government

Students will examine political systems in several regions of the world. They will gain an understanding of both the diversities and commonalities of political culture, tradition, and practice in selected nations of Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S5 905

3 lec/week

PSC 233 - Politics of the Developing World

Comparative examination of the political systems of selected non-western countries, including institutions, electoral systems, principles of governance, causes of political instability and revolution, and techniques of political analysis.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S5 906N

3 lec/week

PSC 251 - Middle East Politics

Religious, political, economic, and social dimensions of life in the modern Middle East. The role of Islam, encounters with Western modernity, Arab-Israeli conflict, and political economy of the region.

3 Semester hour(s)

S5906N

3 lec/week

PSC 261 - International Relations

This course is an introduction to international relations and world politics. It includes studies of international conflict, a history of war, a survey of East-West relations, North-South relations and the problems posed by a more integrated global economy. Case studies of current areas of crises will be emphasized.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S5 904

3 lec/week

PSY 103 - Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts, theories, principles, and research in the field of psychology. This course will survey the scientific study of human and animal characteristics and behavior. Major topics from biological, behavioral, cognitive, personality, developmental, abnormal, and social psychology theory and research will be emphasized. Universal characteristics and individual differences will be explored

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S6 900

3 lec/week

PSY 200 - Human Growth and Development

A study of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the human across the lifespan. Normative and non-normative patterns of development will be examined. Several major theories of human development will be be explored. Practical application of research findings will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: PSY 103 or equivalent.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S6 902

3 lec/week

PSY 211 - Supervisory and Management Psychology

A systematic study of the application of psychological methods and principles in public and private organizations, business, and industry. Emphasis will be on personnel selection, management, supportive supervision and factors influencing efficiency in all organizations.

Prerequisite: PSY 103 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

PSY 214 - Child Developmental Psychology

Child Psychology is an exploration of human growth and development from immediately before conception through adolescence. Content and application of theory and research related to physical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains of child development will be reviewed.

Prerequisite: PSY 103.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S6 903

3 lec/week

PSY 215 - Social Psychology

Social Psychology is a systematic introduction to theory and research on the ways social factors influence individual and group behavior. Examines attitudes, social perception, establishment of norms, conformity, leadership, group dynamics and research methods. (IAI GECC Code S8 900).

Prerequisite: PSY 103.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S8900

3 lec/week

PSY 217 - Abnormal Psychology

Abnormal psychology seeks to describe abnormal behavior from a number of contemporary theoretical and therapeutic viewpoints. Major diagnostic categories are explored. The diagnosis of disorders, their symptoms, etiologies, courses, treatment, and outcomes are core to the course. Applications to daily life, allied health, criminal justice, human development, and various other clinical settings will be common.

Prerequisite: PSY 103 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: PSY 905

3 lec/week

PSY 273 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Industrial/Organizational Psychology is a systematic analysis of human behavior in work organizations. Both individual and group behavior is considered with emphasis on leadership, motivation, and communication within and among organizations.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 100 - Total Quality Control

Total Quality Control is a survey course that traces the development of the concept of total quality control. Emphasis will be on organization, quality costs, quality engineering, process control and quality information equipment.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 101 - ISO 9000

ISO 9000 is a basic course on scope and function of quality assurance, including ISO 9000 regulations (records, vendor selection, procurement quality inspection and measurement techniques).

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 102 - Fundamental Statistical Concepts

Fundamental Statistical Concepts is the interpretation and use of assurance data. A study of the normal distribution, control charts and acceptance sampling will be covered.

Prerequisite: MAT 106 and QLT 101.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 104 - Introduction to Quality Control

This course is designed to familiarize students and workers with the current quality control procedures being used in industry. The student will obtain hands-on knowledge of the quality control procedures being used by domestic and foreign corporations to improve the quality of their products.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

QLT 106 - Metrology

Metrology is designed to develop dimensional measurement ability for skilled workers, inspectors, technicians and for personnel entering a technical occupation. Instruction will be given in both the English and metric system of measurements. Measuring equipment and instruments used include: scales, micrometers, calipers, gage blocks, indicators, production gages, comparators and optical flats.

Prerequisite: MAT 106.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

QLT 110 - Overview Lean Manufacuturing

This course provides an overview of Lean Manufacturing using classroom presentation and an interactive manufacturing simulation exercise. Lean Manufacturing is a business system for organizing and managing production operations that require less time, less space, and less human effort to make products with fewer defects that satisfy the customers needs. Lean culture, the human resource element of lean manufacturing, will be addressed along with measures of lean that are used to foster lean behavior.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

7.5 lecture hours for .5 credits.

QLT 111 - Value Stream Mapping

Value stream maps are the blueprints for lean transformations. The value stream map is a visual representation of every process in the material and information flow, along with key data. It differs from tools such as process mapping or layout diagrams because it includes information flow as well as material flow. This course will teach you how to use the value stream mapping principles to create a current state map for an example company. From the current state map, participants will design a future state map to improve the overall flow of value to the customer. The class will then develop a plan for implementing kaizen (improvement) projects to achieve the future state value stream.

Prerequisite: QLT 110.

1 Semester hour(s)

15 hours of lecture for 1.0 credit hour.

QLT 112 - 5S System for Shop

5S (workplace organization) is a methodology for organizing, cleaning, developing and sustaining a productive work environment. The visual management of the shop floor and office includes the 5Ss, Sort, Straighten, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain. This course will provide the general application of the 5S system and an understanding of the tools and forms to be used with the shop and office projects. Participants will develop a plan for implementing 5S along with standards and methods of auditing 5S progress. This course will also address metrics to assure that meaningful progress is being made.

Prerequisite: QLT 110.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

7.5 lecture hours for .5 credits

QLT 113 - Single Piece Flow/Pull Kanban Systems

Single piece or continuous flow is producing and moving one item at a time through a series of processing steps with each step making just what is requested by the next step. Pull production is a method of production control in which downstream activities provides information to the upstream operation, often via a Kanban card, about what part or material is needed. This course will teach you how to design and implement single piece and pull/Kanban systems that are visually driven, employee-controlled production control systems. Participants will also learn how to implement repetitive and non-repetitive pull systems, to set up point of use storage (POUS), and to interface with material handling systems.

Prerequisite: QLT 110.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

7.5 lecture hours for .5 credits.

QLT 114 - Quick Changeover/Setup Reduction

Reducing the time it takes to switch from the production of one product to another in a machine or cell is a key process on the lean manufacturing journey. Changeover time is the total time elapsed from the last good piece in the run just completed to the first good piece from the process after the changeover. Setup reduction facilitates smaller batch sizes without increased costs. This course will teach you how to achieve quick changeover by analyzing setup and changeover processes and then identifying waste and non-value added activities. Participants will become familiar with setup reduction techniques and various tools and equipment which can aid the setup reduction process. This course will discuss how to calculate reduced economic order quantity based on changeover and inventory carrying costs.

Prerequisite: QLT 110.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

7.5 lecture hours for .5 credits

QLT 115 - Cellular Manufacturing

Cellular manufacturing makes it possible for people and machines to work together as efficiently as possible. This often results in workstations being set up next to each other in the shape of an L, U, or straight line. Thus each production line or part thereof becomes its own cell. In this course, you will learn a multiple step process for connecting the machine and manual processes of similar operations with the goal of eliminating waste and activities that are not adding value. Participants will learn how to link and balance manufacturing operations, then design and implement continuous flow cells. You will learn how to convert traditional batch processing to a cellular layout with continuous parts flow.

Prerequisite: QLT 110.

0.5 Semester hour(s)

7.5 lecture hours for .5 credits

QLT 201 - Advanced Statistical Concepts

Advanced Statistical Concepts presents the latest statistical techniques of quality assurance at the component, the assembly and the systems level. Quality assurance is analyzed from design conception, through consumer use and disposal, including sampling, testing, data analysis and interpretation. A study of capability analysis, sampling plan design and significance studies will be made.

Prerequisites: QLT 102 and MAT 106.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 204 - Self-Directed Work Teams

This course examines the role and function of teams in today's business environment. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and tools applicable to the design, process and evaluation of self directed work teams. This understanding will include the components and characteristics of group dynamics found in work teams.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

QLT 205 - Design of Experiments

An intense study of design of experiments using statistical methods, data gathering and analysis to verify that the design is production feasible. The course will review the techniques to analyze the variations present and the methods that may be necessary to optimize design for productivity and quality requirements.

Prerequisite: QLT 101 and 201.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RAD 184 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience I

Students are oriented to the functions of a hospital radiology department. Students are competency tested in a simulated setting before assignment to a hospital and again in the x-ray department under direct supervision of a registered radiographer in all procedures introduced in RAD 194. Image critique sessions are a regularly scheduled inclusion.

Prerequisite: Admission to Radiologic Technology Program.

3 Semester hour(s)

16 internship/week

RAD 185 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience II

The students' information base is expanded with introduction of additional, more complex radiographic examinations in RAD 195. The student is again competency tested in the lab before assignment to a hospital and the radiography department under direct supervision of a registered radiographer. Students gain additional experience through performance of procedures competently completed in the first semester. Image critique sessions are a regularly scheduled inclusion.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program, RAD 184, RAD 194 and concurrent enrollment in RAD 195.

3 Semester hour(s)

16 internship/week

RAD 186 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience III

The student will gain experience through performance of procedures competently completed in first two semesters and complete final first-year competency evaluations. The student will perform portable procedures, surgical and emergency room procedures and other complex problems involving radiographic examinations in these areas.

Prerequisite: RAD 185, concurrent enrollment in RAD 196.

2 Semester hour(s)

16 internship/week

RAD 191 - Technical Nursing I

This course provides persons in related health care fields with the initial skills and background knowledge to prepare them to perform basic nursing techniques necessary to function in their specific area of health care. This course includes an introduction to legal and ethical responsibilities, communication techniques, interpersonal relationships, medical and surgical asepsis, vital sign measurement, positioning and transfer techniques, and emergency care.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program.

1 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/2 lab for 4 weeks

RAD 192 - Technical Nursing II

This course builds on the beginning skills and background knowledge presented in the Technical Nursing I course. This course provides persons in related health care fields with the more advanced skills and procedures necessary for functioning in their specific area of health care. This course includes a review of vital signs assessment and an introduction to oxygen administration. Course content includes care of patients with special problems, patients with alternative medical treatments, patients during imaging examinations of the gastrointestinal system, and patients during special procedures. Pharmacology and drug administration are included.

Prerequisite: RAD 191

1 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/2 lab for 4 weeks

RAD 194 - Introduction to Radiologic Technology

To introduce the student to the medical field and X-ray examination procedures. Topics include: professional ethics, radiation safety, medical terminology, the radiographic anatomy and positioning of the chest, abdomen and extremities. Introductory information and laboratory practice is provided with relation to radiographic equipment, accessories and exposure factors.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program.

5 Semester hour(s)

4 lec, 2 lab/week

RAD 195 - Intermediate Radiologic Technology

The intermediate level students give attention to specific ethical issues and radiation protection practices. Study of radiographic anatomy and positioning is expanded with attention to the skull, spine and contrast studies of the abdominal and thoracic viscera and spine. There is continuing investigation of the theoretical and mechanical factors affecting exposure values and an introduction to darkroom chemistry and procedures. Laboratory practice is provided to give student experience in processing techniques and continued experience in exposure techniques.

Prerequisite: RAD 194.

5 Semester hour(s)

4 lec, 2 lab/week

RAD 196 - Electricity for Radiologic Technologists

The concepts of electrical circuitry are explored with specific examination of the circuitry of radiographic equipment. The theory of X-ray production is related to the structures of the equipment.

Prerequisite: MAT 106 or 121 or or concurrent.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

RAD 197 - Ionizing Radiation in Medicine

Based on the foundation laid in RAD 196, the students study the characteristics of the various applicable ionizing radiations. Topics include: interactions of radiation and matter, emission spectra, radio-active isotope production and use, therapeutic applications of radiation, and computers are introduced as they will be applicable to radiation therapy and advanced uses of radiation. Radiation safety implications are stressed.

Prerequisite: RAD 196 Recommended: PHY 175.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

RAD 200 - Venipuncture for Radiologic Technology

The various techniques for obtaining blood samples are taught, emphasis is on quality samples and safety. Injection techniques are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in Radiologic Technology Program.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

RAD 284 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience IV

The student having competently performed exams during the first three semesters now functions more independently in the radiologic department to perfect previous skills. More emphasis is placed on examination of trauma patients, surgical radiography and pediatric procedures. Image critique continues and emphasis is on quality assurance problems coordinated with RAD 294.

Prerequisite: RAD 186, concurrent enrollment in RAD 294.

4 Semester hour(s)

24 internship/week

RAD 285 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience V

The student continues to function more independently and performs emergency radiographic procedures during day, evening and weekend shifts with indirect supervision of a registered radiographer. The student becomes involved in special procedure radiography, including assignment at affiliate hospitals performing a high volume of specialized work. Film critique continues and final competency testing is performed by student in areas previously tested.

Prerequisite: RAD 284, concurrent enrollment in RAD 296.

4 Semester hour(s)

24 internship/week

RAD 286 - Radiologic Technology Clinical Experience VI

The student continues to perform independently with minimal supervision of a registered radiographer and final competency testing is completed in preparation for assuming a position as staff technologist. Film critiques are continued, focusing on complex problems and exams. Student may do an elective rotation in a specialty area of interest.

Prerequisite: RAD 285, concurrent enrollment in RAD 297.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 internship/12 weeks

RAD 294 - Quality Control in Radiography

Emphasis is placed on the interactions among radiographic accessories, processing and film characteristics. Students are given practical problems and trouble-shooting abilities are developed. Radiographic anatomy and positioning studies continue with attention directed toward bedside and surgical radiography.

Prerequisite: RAD 196.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RAD 295 - Special Radiographic Procedures

Radiologic anatomy and positioning studies continue with attention toward special procedures, tomography, angiography, mammography, selective arteriography, arthrography, salpingography, lymphography and myelography.

Prerequisite: RAD 197 and RAD 294.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RAD 296 - Survey of Disciplines Applied to Radiology

The special topics covered include: pediatric radiology, nuclear medicine technology, digital radiography, CT, MRI, ultrasound, administration and a survey of medical and surgical disease processes as they relate to radiologic modalities. In addition, a review and summary of all radiographic anatomy is provided.

Prerequisite: RAD 294.

4 Semester hour(s)

4 lec/week

RAD 297 - Advanced Radiologic Technology Seminar

The course is intended as a review of previous course materials and preparation for the Registry Examination in Diagnostic Radiography. Special problems and issues (especially ethical and safety issues) will be dealt with as appropriate. Students will be assisted with career decisions and special efforts toward immediate job placement will be made.

Prerequisite: RAD 295 and RAD 296.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

RCT 100 - Cross Sectional Anatomy

Anatomy of the human body will be studied in cross section. Anatomy of the brain, neck, thorax, abdomen/pelvis and the musculoskeletal system will be presented in the axial (transverse), sagittal, coronal, and orthogonal (oblique) imaging planes using multiple diagnostic imaging modalities. Anatomical structure, location, and function will be identified using illustrations and radiographic images comparing computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Prerequisite: RAD 296 or instructor consent with proof of ARRT Certification.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RCT 101 - Computed Tomography Physics & Equipment

The course is intended to provide the technologist with comprehensive knowledge of instrumentation and physics of a computerized tomography unit. Fundamentals of data acquisition with a digital system, concepts of image reconstruction principles in conventional, helical and multislice helical installations are included. Other principles of the technology include: image manipulation and visualization, radiation dose, scan parameters, and quality control. Advanced imaging utilizing 3D imaging, CT angiography, PET, and virtual reality imaging are introduced.

Prerequisite: Admission to the CT Certificate Program.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RCT 102 - Computed Tomography Procedures

The course is intended to provide the technologist with comprehensive knowledge of computed tomography procedures. An emphasis is placed on radiation safety, patient care and assessment. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of contrast agents and injection techniques, CT protocols and procedures. Pathology and its appearance on the CT image, PET fusion imaging, and interventional CT procedures are introduced.

Prerequisite: Admission to the CT Certificate Program.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RCT 103 - CT Clinical Applications

Students function in the CT department under the direct supervision of a technologist to complete CT procedures. Students will use theory and techniques learned in the didactic courses of the program and apply these in the clinical setting. Arrangement for clinical education will be selected according to student geographic area. Students will demonstrate progression in clinical competency through the course.

Prerequisite: Admission to the CT Certificate Program.

7 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

RDG 095 - Developmental Reading

Designed for the student needing improvement of reading vocabulary, rate and comprehension. This course is for the student who reads at less than the ninth grade level.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RDG 098 - Efficient Reading

This course emphasizes the overall importance of reading, comprehension, and vocabulary. Students will prepare for success with college level reading and study skill requirements. This class is open only to students reading at the secondary level or above.

Prerequisite: Completion of RDG 095 or a placement test score at the secondary level.

3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

REC 230 - Leadership in Leisure Studies

A study of the theory, principles, and processes of leadership in the delivery of leisure services. Field experience required.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

REC 276 - Perspectives in Outdoor Recreation

This course examines the outdoor recreation movement in America and its impact on natural resources; reviews relationships between changing public demand and the many agencies involved in supplying outdoor recreation.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

RMS 112 - Medical Sonography Clinical Exp II

Students are placed in a health care institution to reinforce and broaden knowledge gained in Clinical Education I. Technical and professional aspects of patient scanning in: obstetrics, pelvic, abdominal, and superficial structures.

Prerequisite: Consent of program coordinator.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

RMS 113 - Medical Sonography Clinical Exp III

Continuation of Diagnostic Medical Imaging Sonography clinical experience in a health care institution. Reinforcement and broadening of knowledge gained in RMS 112. Technical and professional aspects of patient scanning in: obstetrics, pelvic, abdominal, and superficial structures.

Prerequisite: RMS 112 and consent of program coordinator.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

RMS 114 - Medical Sonography Clinical Exp IV

Continuation of Diagnostic Medical Imaging Sonography clinical experience in a health care institution. Reinforcement and broadening of knowledge gained in RMS 113. Technical and professional aspects of patient scanning in : obstetrics, pelvic, abdominal and superficial structures.

Prerequisite: Pre-enrollment criteria, RMS 113 and consent of program coordinator.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

RMS 212 - Medical Sonography Vascular Clinical Exp I

Supervised clinical training in vascular imaging skills. Students will observe, assist, and perform various patient imaging procedures. The focus of this course is clinical skills, professionalism, and correct performance of hospital procedures and policies.

Prerequisite: Pre-enrollment criteria and admission to program.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

RMS 213 - Medical Sonography Vascular Clinical Exp II

Supervised clinical training in vascular imaging skills. Students will observe, assist, and perform various patient imaging procedures. The focus of this course is clinical skills, professionalism, and correct performance of hospital procedures and policies. This course builds upon those skills learned in the classroom and RMS 212.

Prerequisite: Pre-enrollment criteria and completion of RMS 212.

3 Semester hour(s)

24 lab/week

SOC 111 - Introduction to Sociology

Students will be introduced to the perspective, concepts and methods of sociology. Emphasis will be given to how the groups that make up our society function. The forces that hold groups together or cause them to change will be explored while the students examine how they learn to play roles within the family, school, religion, peer groups and in other social settings.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S7 900

3 lec/week

SOC 112 - Social Problems

A study of the nature of social problems including strategies for achieving social change. Students will participate in the selection and presentation to the class of the specific problems to be considered. Investigation of local communities will constitute an important aspect of the course.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S7 901

3 lec/week

SOC 115 - Introduction to Anthropology

This course is a study of the biological and cultural origins and variations of human beings. Humans' adaptation to different natural environments and resulting modes of social-cultural systems and behaviors are emphasized via selected case studies of extinct and extant human groups. Principles of ethnography, archaeology, and linguistics shall be addressed throughout the course.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S1 900N

3 lec/week

SOC 116 - General Cultural Anthropology

An analysis of the origin and basis of culture- its major components, cultural variation, cultural evolution and cultural adaptation. Analysis of selected cultures as case studies.

Prerequisite: SOC 115 is recommended.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S1 901N

3 lec/week

SOC 200 - Introduction to Social Work

Students will be introduced to the profession of social work with an emphasis on the generalist approach. The course will encourage the student to develop reasoning capacities while examining some of the controversial, contemporary issues in social welfare. Current social services available and gaps in services will be explored by the student. The student will examine the knowledge, skills and values needed for effective social work practice.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

SOC 231 - Topics/Issues in the Social Sciences

This course will be designed to meet the special needs and interests of students on an occasional basis. Topics to be addressed may be from the areas of history, geography, economics, anthropology, sociology, psychology and political science.

1, 2 or 3 Semester hour(s)

1-2-3 lec/week

SOC 251 - Human Sexuality and Marriage

This course assesses psychological, sociological and biological perspectives on human sexuality, courtship and marriage in the contemporary United States. Emphasis is placed on sex-role acquisition as part of the general development of personality; the psychosocial aspects of dating, courtship, family planning, parenthood, marital dissolution and remarriage; family functions and problems; alternatives to the traditional family; and the changing nature of family life.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: S7 902

3 lec/week

SPE 121 - Speech Practicum

Individual study and work in various activities of the forensics program. Students will participate in tournaments and workshops to display their talents in speech events (extemporaneous speaking, informative speaking, oral interpretation, impromptu speaking, after-dinner speaking, radio speaking, oratory and listening).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

SPE 131 - Introduction to Oral Communication

A study of communication theory as applied to speech. Designed to improve the students ability to speak and listen, as well as to increase his/her own awareness of communicative concepts, principles and theories. Practical communication experiences in the class range from intrapersonal through interpersonal to public communication situations.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: C2 900

3 lec/week

SPE 151 - Interpersonal Communications

A basic course presenting the theoretical and practical background of interpersonal communication. Analysis and practice of the psychological, social and decision-making functions of interpersonal communication are incorporated as a foundation to communicate competence. Relationship skills in the home, workplace and social environments will be explored, analyzed and practiced.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

SPE 161 - Group Discussion

An introduction to the fundamental principles of problem-solving by a group and practice in the basic process of democratic decision making. Units of study include the pattern of thought in the problem solving process, the use of evidence and reasoning and leadership in group discussion.

Prerequisite: SPE 131 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

SPE 181 - Introduction to Mass Communication

This course is an overview of the history and development of various media: books, magazines, newspapers, radio, television, film audio and video recording and the information superhighway. Exploration of timely issues involving mass communication industries, how they operate in current economic, legal, political and global climates, and how these technologies are impacting society are reviewed.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: MC 911

3 lec/week

SPE 231 - Public Speaking

An analysis of the principles of organization, support and presentation of public speeches. Instruction and practice in audience analysis, motivational devices, selection of supportive material and platform behavior in public address.

Prerequisite: SPE 131 or consent of instructor.

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

THE 141 - Introduction to Theatre

The study of the constituent elements of the theatre arts, examining these elements from the perspective of the audience as well as from that of the theatre practitioners. Consideration will be given to the dramatic text, the actor, technical elements of theatre and the place of theatre in our society and a view of the history of the theatre arts will also be provided.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: F1 907

3 lec/week

THE 142 - Introduction to Technical Theatre

By combining in-class work with practical application, this course introduces students to the basic elements of technical production. Students will apply knowledge by completing technical work on a full scale production. This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of basic materials, practices, and safety procedures involved in several technical disciplines. The topics covered will include scenic design and construction, costume design and construction, lighting design and practice, and audio systems and equipment. Other topics will depend upon the needs of the production such as prop design and construction and makeup design and application. Professionals from the community will take part in the instruction of this course.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

THE 145 - Basic Acting

This course trains the student in concentration, imagination, observation and the effective use of voice and body, all of which are fundamental to the actor's craft. Basic experiences in scene study will also be provided, so that students will learn to adapt performance elements to the demands of dramatic texts.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: TA 914

3 lec/week

THE 147 - Theatre Practicum

Students receive credit for practical theatre experiences onstage in performance and backstage on work crews related to theatrical productions in the theatre program. This course may be repeated for a maximum of four credits. Admission into this course must be approved by the Instructor.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

1 Semester hour(s)

2 lab/week

THE 232 - Introduction to Performance of Literature

Designed to increase student understanding and appreciation of texts, especially literary works of art, through the simultaneous development of understanding and skill in performance. Areas of study will include: literary theory, literary analysis, the text-performer relationship, and the development of body and voice skills. Students will experience performing in various literary genres.

3 Semester hour(s)

IAI: TA 916

3 lec/week

THE 245 - Intermediate Acting

This course hones skills such as character and script analysis, impulse, observation, action, and listening. Through an exploration of movement techniques and exercises, students will develop an awareness of physical and vocal expressions and character. Students will focus on playing objectives and action as they pertain to specific character relationships. Instruction and practice will be given in scence analysis and the application of that analysis to the rehearsal process and to performance situations.

Prerequisite: SPE 145

3 Semester hour(s)

3 lec/week

VOC 176 - Pharmacology Non-Licensed Personnel

The student will acquire an understanding of basic pharmacology and the effects of several drugs on clients. Instruction will include the uses, sources, forms, and delivery routes of drugs. Knowledge will be gained in the areas of drug classifications, actions, and adverse reactions, along with legal implementation regarding controlled substances and other medications. Current technology will be utilized to master course objectives.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lecture/week

VOC 250 - Introduction to Public Health

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive view of what public health is and how it functions in today's world. Emphasis will be placed on learning to be a leader in public health by understanding the three core functions of public health , critical thinking and the tool of collaboration.

1 Semester hour(s)

1 lec/week

VOC 276 - Medications in Action

The study of medications and their action on the body. Includes an overview of normal physiology and pathophysiology as they relate to specific drug therapy; classification and general drug actions; common side effects; and nursing implications associated with specific drugs.

Prerequisites: Licensed health care provider or students currently enrolled in health programs with instructor's permission.

2 Semester hour(s)

2 lec/week

WLD 101 - Industrial MIG Welding

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of arc welding fundamentals including: welding safety, MIG welding, blueprint reading, welding symbols, AWS 14.3 welding standard, oxyacetylene cutting, air carbon arc, reclaim welding and cutting. Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality MIG welds is included with emphasis placed in the areas of various joint configurations, single pass, multiple pass, fillet, and groove, overlap welds in flat and horizontal position. Oxyacetylene welding and cutting equipment setup and safety will also be emphasized.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 102 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding

This course introduces the fundamental theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Qualification tests in flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 103 - MIG Welding

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Metal Inert Gas (MIG) arc welding fundamentals, also referred to as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), including the following topics: welding safety, power sources and wire feeders, machine setup, adjustment and maintenance, identification of welding defects and quality welds, metal transfer methods, wire selection, shielding gas selection, testing procedures, and other MIG processes (including FCAW, SAW and Aluminum MIG). Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality MIG welds is included with emphasis placed in the areas of various joint configurations, single pass, multiple pass, fillet, groove, and overlap welds in flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 104 - TIG Welding

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) arc welding fundamentals, also referred to as Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), including the following topics: welding safety, power sources, machine setup, adjustment and maintenance, identification of welding defects and quality welds, filler wire selection, shielding gas selection, testing procedures, other TIG processes including stainless steel and aluminum. Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality TIG welds is included with emphasis placed in the areas of various joint configurations, single pass, multiple pass, fillet, groove, and overlap welds in flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions.

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 106 - Welding Fundamentals

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the basics of Metal Inert Gas (MIG) arc welding fundamentals, also referred to as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and stick welding, also referred to as Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) including the following topics: welding safety, power sources, and wire feeders, machine set up, adjustment and maintenance, identification of welding defects and quality welds, and welding techniques. Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality MIG and SMAW welds is included with emphasis placed in the areas of various joint configurations, single pass, multiple pass, fillet, groove, overlap welds in a flat position. Oxyacetylene cutting equipment setup and safety will also be emphasized.

2 Semester hour(s)

1 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 132 - Horizontal Pipe Welding-2G

This course introduces the fundamental theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) on a horizontal beveled plate and in a 2G pipe position. Qualification tests in horizontal beveled plates and 2G are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds.

Prerequisite: WLD 102.

3 Semester hour(s) Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 134 - TIG-Small Diameter Pipe

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Tungsten Inert gas (TIG), also referred to as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), on small diameter, thin wall pipe, including the following topics: welding safety, power sources, machine setup, adjustment and maintenance, identification of welding defects and quality welds, filler wire selection, shielding gas selection, and testing procedures. Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality TIG welds is included with emphasis placed in the area of small diameter, thin wall pipe in all positions.

Prerequisite: WLD 104.

3 Semester hour(s) Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 135 - Vertical Pipe Welding-5G

This course introduces the fundamental theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) on a vertical beveled plate and in a 5G pipe position. Qualification tests in vertical beveled plates and 5G are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds.

Prerequisite: WLD 102.

3 Semester hour(s) Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 136 - Angled Pipe Welding-6G

This course introduces the fundamental theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) on a vertical 45 degree angle beveled plate and in a 6G pipe position. Qualification tests in vertical 45 degree angle beveled plates and 6G are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial welds.

Prerequisite: WLD 102.

3 Semester hours Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 137 - TIG-Large Diameter Pipe

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Tungsten Inert gas (TIG), also referred to as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), on large diameter, thick wall pipe, including the following topics: welding safety, power sources, machine setup, adjustment and maintenance, identification of welding defects and quality welds, filler wire selection, shielding gas selection, and testing procedures. Training to develop the manual skills necessary to make high quality TIG welds is included with emphasis placed in the area of large diameter, thick wall pipe in all positions.

Prerequisite: WLD 104.

3 Semester hour(s) Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 140 - Basic Robotic Welding

This course is designed to give students hands-on understanding of robotic arc welding. Topics to be covered include safely jogging the robot, setting up welding equipment, robotic welding teach pendent, robotic welding parameters, motion types, programming examples, saving and backing up robot programs and controller files. Students will develop robotic welding programs using robot controllers application software and hardware.

WLD 103 - MIG Welding

3 Semester hour(s)

2 lec, 2 lab/week

WLD 250 - Welding Internship

Participation in a work experience in an area of welding under supervision of both the College and an employer. Internship objectives will be identified for each student enrolled.

Five semester credit hours in major field and consent of instructor.

2 Semester hour(s)

10 lab/week

WLD 299 - Topics and Issues in Welding

This course will present current topics/issues of interest to the welding profession. (Topic to be listed on the students permanent academic record.)

.5 to 4 Semester hour(s)

.5-4 lec/week